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Cay Horstmann

Cay Horstmann is author of Core Java (Sun Microsystems Press 1996-2009), Enterprise Java for Elvis (Sun Microsystems Press, to appear), and co-author of Core JSF (Sun Microsystems Press 2004-2009) Cay is professor of computer science at San Jose State University. He is a computer science series editor at Prentice-Hall and a frequent speaker at computer industry conferences. For four years, Cay was VP and CTO of an Internet startup that went from 3 people in a tiny office to a public company.
 

Weblogs

In this blog, I describe how the Racket language provides fun graphics and a nifty web framework. The  former is great for beginning students, and the latter is helpful for grasping the mind-...

In this blog, I address my grief with blog uploading, following Paul Graham's advice about choosing technology. ♦ 

In this blog, I ponder why Ruby and Scala are easy to learn and complex to master, and how their cultures differ. ♦

In 1995, I got a call from Gary Cornell who told me that we were going to write a Java book. That surprised me—I didn't know any Java, and I was pretty sure that Gary didn't know it either....

I have students running Windows, Linux, and Mac OS X, and I like to encourage students to choose whatever platform makes them most productive. But I also like to be able to give out one set of...

When the time comes for my graduate students to write their project reports, I give them a long checklist of do's and don'ts. One of the more vexing issues is the code font. I am astonished how...

When Oracle, in its Android lawsuit, accused Google of copyright violation, I didn't think this was going to stick. I was pretty surprised when the PolicyNodeImpl...

I ran into this blog about making a pretty drawing in C# and F#.

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Stephen Colebourne has a very interesting article on the Next Big JVM Language (NBJL). The comments are good too...

In 2002, JSF was introduced at Java One as “Swing for the Web”. The vision was that you would compose professionally designed components into web pages, add a bit of Java glue code,...

Mark Reinhold just published a blog stating what has been painfully obvious to everyone following the JDK 7 development: There is no way...

I am working on a web site that will help students practice their Scala programming skills.

I am on sabbatical in Vietnam right now, and today the country celebrates independence day. (On September 2, 1945, Ho Chi Minh gave his...

Now here's a topic on which everybody has an opinion—brace styles. One common style...

My dad is visiting, and he just picked up his rental car. He proudly announced that he got a good deal on a compact car without power windows...

Yesterday, I installed shiny new Ubuntu Lucid Lynx on a shiny new laptop. This morning, I launched a Web Start application, and I got the following screen:

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In my last blog, I outlined how I found the Scala XML library a pleasant solution for unpleasant XML format conversion jobs. In those jobs, I had to completely transform the document from one...

A few months ago, I had one of those unpleasant format conversion jobs. I had about 1,000 multiple choice questions in RTF format and needed to import them into...

I am working on rewriting a set of labs for our intermediate students at SJSU. Version control is something that everyone with a CS degree is pretty much expected to know these days, so I thought...

Composite components are a great feature of JSF 2.0. The canonical example is a login component with fields for the username and password:

<mylib:login...

One nice thing about JSF 2.0 is that they have taken good ideas from elsewhere, such as the “project stage” concept from Rails. If you set the project stage to ”development...

JSF 2 introduces an EL variable flash. Anything you set persists for one post-redirect-get cycle. (In contrast, anything in the request scope is gone after a...

A few weeks ago, Ed Burns posted a link to a blog on the JSF expert group mailing list, commenting...

As I happily wrote about new features of JSF 2.0, my coauthor David Geary kept asking me how to run the examples in Tomcat 6. I kept putting it off—hunting down all those JAR files and...

Java EE 6 has three different ways of defining “beans” that are “managed” in one way or another. Here is a quick recap.

JSR 314

JSF 2.0 introduced...

For the upcoming semester, I want to run a learning management system into which I can integrate an experimental feature for...

Today, a tantalizing announcement by Mark Reinhold about closures in Java 7 has made its way through the twittersphere.

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I wanted to trace exactly what happens when a JSF page uses a redirect. Here are my experiences with the HTTP and TCP/IP monitors in NetBeans and Eclipse, and why I ended up using...