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Eamonn McManus

Eamonn McManus is the technical lead of the JavaFX Authoring Tool team at Oracle Corporation. Before that, he was the tech lead of the JMX team, and headed the technical work on JSR 255 (JMX API 2.0) and JSR 262 (Web Services Connector for JMX Agents). In a previous life, he worked at the Open Software Foundation's Research Institute on the Mach microkernel and countless other things, including a TCP/IP stack written in Java. In an even previouser life, he worked on modem firmware in Z80 assembler. He is Irish, but lives and works in France and in French. His first name is pronounced Aymun (more or less) and is correctly written with an acute accent on the first letter, which however he long ago despaired of getting intact through computer systems.

 

Weblogs

I previously wrote about compiling the JMX API in Mustang by extracting the necessary subset of the...

The JSRs that define the JMX API are being updated through the Java Community Process. JSR 3, which defines the original JMX API, is undergoing its...

Luis-Miguel Alventosa from Sun's JMX Technology team will be presenting Monitoring and Management in Java SE 5.0...

As you'll no doubt have read href="http://weblogs....

One of the important new features of the JMX API in Mustang...

Daniel Fuchs summarizes the resources available to people with questions about JMX technology...

The JMX plugin for NetBeans has graduated from version 0.x to version 1.0. It's now available from the main NetBeans Update Center, rather than the Update Center Beta as before. My colleague...

There are tons of books and articles about how to design and write good Java code, but surprisingly little about the specific topic of API design. On my...

How would you go about using the JMX API to instrument AWT events? What would it gain you? My colleague Jean-François Denise...

There's a plugin for NetBeans that supports the JMX API. It allows you to create and modify JMX MBeans through a wizard, to create unit tests for them, and to run an application and...

Descriptors allow you to give additional information about
MBeans to management clients. For example, a Descriptor on an
MBean attribute might say what units it is...

The Tiger JDK introduced a nifty feature whereby you could run an application with -Dcom.sun.management.jmxremote and then later connect to it using the jconsole...

In a
comment
on my last entry, rgreig asks:

...

Summer is of course the time when people take their vacation,
and nowhere more so than here in France.

The Java SE sources are downloadable from java.net, and you can
change and extend them within the constraints of the relevant
licenses. But building the whole of Java SE...

The consistently excellent Brian Goetz has written a new article in his Java Theory and Practice series entitled...

With a Standard MBean, you define the management interface of
the MBean using a Java interface. Getters and setters in the
interface define attributes, and other methods...


Yesterday
I talked about how you can use
...

Suppose (to take my favourite example), you have some sort of
cache, and you want to be able to control it via an MBean. You
might have something a bit like this:

One of the changes we made in version 1.1 of the JMX API, way back in early 2002, was to modify the serialization of certain classes. Because remote access was not part of the API at this time,...

The short answer is: you can, but you probably shouldn't.
Here's why.

To be clear, here's the sort of thing I'm talking about:

JavaOne is always a huge buzz, and this year was no exception. Of
course the technical sessions are very worthwhile, so it's great news
that slides and audio for all of them will be...

This article by D J Walker-Morgan covers how to use JConsole to see VM information, and especially how to write an...

We've posted a detailed set of guidelines for using the JMX API, the result of several years' experience with it.

Starting from the JMX Technology Home Page at...

I'm the Specification Lead for Java Management Extensions (JMX) technology and I expect to be talking about it quite a bit in this blog.

The JMX API is part of the core Java platform as of...