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James Duncan Davidson

James Duncan Davidson is a freelance author, software developer, and consultant focusing on Mac OS X, Java, XML, and Open Source technologies. He created Apache Tomcat and Apache Ant and was instrumental in their donation to the Apache Software Foundation by Sun Microsystems. While at Sun he lead the expert groups for two versions of the Java Servlet API and served as one of the architects of the J2EE platform. He is the author of Learning Cocoa with Objective-C, co-author of Cocoa in a Nutshell, and a contributor to Mac OS X Hacks (all published by O'Reilly and Associates) and publisher of his own website, x180, where he keeps his popular weblog.

 

Weblogs

Cory Doctorow has just published an essay titled Trademarks over on the O'Reilly Network that the executives at...

Sometime yesterday (ok, really the day before that now) Ken Arnold started in on his Hack. You see, at MacHack...

I just ran into Ken Arnold at MacHack (he's giving the keynote tonight at midnight) and after chatting a bit, we picked back up the Ant conversation we were...

Now that JavaOne and the Wisconsin Software Symposium are done, I've headed further east and am in Cleveland...

The front page for Java.net has been down for a while today. The good news is that only the front page is down. Apparently, the infrastructure for the Java.net gaggle of servers is spread around...

After a fun week in San Francisco for JavaOne, there's a group of us, including fellow Java.net bloggers Jason Hunter,...

One of the surprising things about JavaOne for me this year is the amount of talk about Ant. Not the normal "Ant is cool" buzz that I hear (and which still amazes me), but a different...

One of the interesting things for me about the Java.net experiment so far has been checking out the reactions from the blogosphere that I navigate through every day....

Mike Cannon-Brookes says that Java.net wasn't really launched today because it's not linked in from...

Matt Raible (whose blog I read) has a few questions about the Java.net blogs. Here are some answers:

Is the...

The morning keynote is done and over with. There wasn't a lot there that stuck with me, but then, it's the non-technical keynote. So what did stick? Two things. One was the best line of the...

It's after 9 in the morning. An unnatural time for a software developer to be awake. And even more unnatural after having been up late last night socializing (the most important part of JavaOne...

The well known secret of JavaOne is that the best stuff doesn't happen behind the doors of the presentation rooms at Moscone, but it happens in the restaurants, bars, and other meeting spots...

Once again, JavaOne is upon us. It's hard to believe that this is the 8th JavaOne since it all started. Somehow, amazingly, I've been to each and every one. And each year is different. The first...