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Best Bluray player

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castana
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Joined: 2007-05-08
Points: 0

Hi all,
I am trying into one PC workstation several BD-J projects but I would like to test them by Bluray player.
I have read PS3 is the best player at the moment but as I am interested in trying advances features such as internet access, I am not sure that PS3 was the best for try it, for that reason, What is the best bluray player to try BD-J programming? Could you advise me?
Thanks in advance.
Best Regards.
Alejandro Castan

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Bill Sheppard

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castana
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Joined: 2007-05-08
Points: 0

Hi all again,
First, thanks to answer to my question so fast
Maybe, I made a mistake when I said BETTER bluray player when I would have to say MORE COMPLETE bluray player, since I am interested in testing BD- LIVE and BONUS VIEW features.
In that case, maybe the PS3 is more inexpensive in the market to test these advanced features.
Please, if anybody know some other player with BD-LIVE and BONUS VIEW features please let me know it.
Thanks a lot
Alejandro

maciejka79
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Joined: 2008-02-07
Points: 0

i think you can find everything on this site:
http://www.blu-ray.com/players/

terymas
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Joined: 2007-09-03
Points: 0

Hi Alejandro,

here we have all BD players of the wolrd and of the univers ; )
PS3 is the best BD player, that's all.

Buy a PS3 create a simple project with your features.
When your project is finish try on a another BD player...

Good luck,

Tery

jeffkinzer
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Joined: 2007-06-05
Points: 0

I agree, the PS3 is the best player I have seen. However, I have not seen any > $1k player.

Bill Foote

Allow me to give a contrary opinion. But first, you
have to answer the question "best for doing what?"

The PS3 is definitely the fastest Blu-ray player (with
the possible exception of PC software players, of course).
If you're looking for a fast player, and you don't care
about anything else, the the PS3 is unquestionably "best".

However, if you're in the business of producing commercial
Blu-ray software that provides a good consumer experience
on all players, then one of the most important things you can
do is to test regularly on a slow player. It's easy to make
software look good on fast hardware; the quality of software
is better judged by how it works on the low end of your target
device profile. So, for measuring performance, the PS3 is
one of the worst players. If you're serious about producing
real Blu-ray software (as opposed to a Blu-ray disc that only
really plays on a PS3), you absolutely need to do regular
development on something else.

A different use is to have a player in your living room that
you use to watch movies. The PS3 is a fine machine, but I
must admit it's not my favorite. It is really fast, works
reliably, and is profile 2 (that is, the Internet connection
can be accessed from Blu-ray). However, it consumes a lot
of power (around 200 watts), and has a cooling fan that I
notice, especially when watching a movie with quiet scenes.
This is by no means a criticism of the PS3 -- it was designed
to be a game console, after all, and games are not known for
long dramatic pauses and soundtracks with high dynamic range.

Personally, I'm not terribly interested in video games, or in
other features of the PS3 - if I want to watch highly compressed
240p15 video on YouTube, I usually go for the mac laptop I keep
in my living room, and not the PS3 :-) . So, for my money and
as a consumer who mostly watches movies, I think I'd probably
buy a dedicated BD player rather than a game console.

That's what's "best" for me, but of course YMMV.

Bill

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Bill Sheppard

To expand on Bill's comments, you definitely want a low-end player to
make sure your app works acceptably, but you want to be certain
everything works on the PS3 since it reflects 80+% of the current
population of Blu-ray players. For the low-end you might consider the
Sony BDP-S300. It's probably the most common low-end player, and was
recently available at Amazon for $199. Another one to consider is the
Insignia player at Best Buy - it's $229 when not on sale and shares
hardware and firmware with players from Philips, Magnavox, and Sylvania,
so should represent a reasonable market share.

BillS

Bill Foote wrote:
>
>
> Allow me to give a contrary opinion. But first, you
> have to answer the question "best for doing what?"
>
> The PS3 is definitely the fastest Blu-ray player (with
> the possible exception of PC software players, of course).
> If you're looking for a fast player, and you don't care
> about anything else, the the PS3 is unquestionably "best".
>
> However, if you're in the business of producing commercial
> Blu-ray software that provides a good consumer experience
> on all players, then one of the most important things you can
> do is to test regularly on a slow player. It's easy to make
> software look good on fast hardware; the quality of software
> is better judged by how it works on the low end of your target
> device profile. So, for measuring performance, the PS3 is
> one of the worst players. If you're serious about producing
> real Blu-ray software (as opposed to a Blu-ray disc that only
> really plays on a PS3), you absolutely need to do regular
> development on something else.
>
> A different use is to have a player in your living room that
> you use to watch movies. The PS3 is a fine machine, but I
> must admit it's not my favorite. It is really fast, works
> reliably, and is profile 2 (that is, the Internet connection
> can be accessed from Blu-ray). However, it consumes a lot
> of power (around 200 watts), and has a cooling fan that I
> notice, especially when watching a movie with quiet scenes.
> This is by no means a criticism of the PS3 -- it was designed
> to be a game console, after all, and games are not known for
> long dramatic pauses and soundtracks with high dynamic range.
>
> Personally, I'm not terribly interested in video games, or in
> other features of the PS3 - if I want to watch highly compressed
> 240p15 video on YouTube, I usually go for the mac laptop I keep
> in my living room, and not the PS3 :-) . So, for my money and
> as a consumer who mostly watches movies, I think I'd probably
> buy a dedicated BD player rather than a game console.
>
> That's what's "best" for me, but of course YMMV.
>
> Bill
>
>
>
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> To unsubscribe, e-mail: bd-j-dev-unsubscribe@hdcookbook.dev.java.net
> For additional commands, e-mail: bd-j-dev-help@hdcookbook.dev.java.net
>

--
*Bill Sheppard*
Chief Digital Media Officer
Client Software Group
*Sun Microsystems, Inc.*
4220 Network Circle M/S USCA22-316
Santa Clara, CA 95054 USA
Phone/Fax: +1 408 404-1254
Email bill.sheppard@sun.com

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