Skip to main content

Dumb question about Direct?????

3 replies [Last post]
Anonymous

Sorry for the dumb question but I see references to DirectDraw, DirecX and Direct3D.

Could someone briefly describe the difference between the three and what exactly
is Java doing with regard to using DirectDraw, DirectX and Direct3D?

Which one is being used for the OpenGL pipeline?

===========================================================================
To unsubscribe, send email to listserv@java.sun.com and include in the body
of the message "signoff JAVA2D-INTEREST". For general help, send email to
listserv@java.sun.com and include in the body of the message "help".

Reply viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.
linuxhippy
Offline
Joined: 2004-01-07

DirectX = The whole collection of APIs for different game-related tasks like DirectInput for input handling, Direct3D for 3D graphics, ...
DirectDraw = 2D programming interface, now deprecated.
Direct3D = 2D/3D interface offered by DirectX.

The OpenGL pipeline uses OpenGL and does not use DirectX at all. Because of this fact its able to work on so many operating systems whereas the D3D pipeline is limited to Windows-Systems only.

lg Clemens

Ken Warner

So then the line in the sand (so to speak) is whether or not the graphics
card (driver) supports OpenGL to it's full extent? Yes? No?

If there is not good support for OpenGL on the host machine, then
Java's OpenGL pipeline will fail? Yes? No?

So then this is not about the OS as earlier stated. It's about
support for OpenGL by the graphic card's driver? Yes? No?

java2d@JAVADESKTOP.ORG wrote:
> DirectX = The whole collection of APIs for different game-related tasks like DirectInput for input handling, Direct3D for 3D graphics, ...
> DirectDraw = 2D programming interface, now deprecated.
> Direct3D = 2D/3D interface offered by DirectX.
>
> The OpenGL pipeline uses OpenGL and does not use DirectX at all. Because of this fact its able to work on so many operating systems whereas the D3D pipeline is limited to Windows-Systems only.
>
>
> lg Clemens
> [Message sent by forum member 'linuxhippy' (linuxhippy)]
>
> http://forums.java.net/jive/thread.jspa?messageID=246977
>
> ===========================================================================
> To unsubscribe, send email to listserv@java.sun.com and include in the body
> of the message "signoff JAVA2D-INTEREST". For general help, send email to
> listserv@java.sun.com and include in the body of the message "help".
>
>

===========================================================================
To unsubscribe, send email to listserv@java.sun.com and include in the body
of the message "signoff JAVA2D-INTEREST". For general help, send email to
listserv@java.sun.com and include in the body of the message "help".

linuxhippy
Offline
Joined: 2004-01-07

First of all why do you ask in such a strange manner - I am just a user answering questions here.

> So then the line in the sand (so to speak) is whether
> or not the graphics
> card (driver) supports OpenGL to it's full extent?
> Yes? No?
> If there is not good support for OpenGL on the host
> machine, then
> Java's OpenGL pipeline will fail? Yes? No?
Rigth, sometimes it will detect broken or weak drivers, and sometimes it will simply not work correctly.

> So then this is not about the OS as earlier stated.
> It's about
> upport for OpenGL by the graphic card's driver? Yes?
> No?
I don't remember anybody statet that the OpenGL pipeline was OS-specific or disabled on some operating systems.Till now it is not used by default on any operating system, but you can enable it using -Dsun.java2d.opengl=True.

lg Clemens