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Is jxta going to be a dead cat

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soloss
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Joined: 2007-02-11
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I am trying to develop a P2P software using JXTA, I go through the JXTA website. I get a very bad feeling that JXTA is going to be dead. Not many real commercial P2P products are based on JXTA technology. It's a lot difficult to have get customer support infomation from neither inter or JXTA newsgroups.

My question to SUN JXTA platform team is

How a scalable commercial P2P product can be developed based on JXTA? Is there any comercial products winning story out there? What's the future of JXTA using in commercial market? How much the risk if pick up JXTA to develop comercial product?

Any SUN JXTA platform developer could give an insight view of the above questions?

I guess the goal of JXTA is targeting on comercial market, NOT student project.

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carnado
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Joined: 2007-08-21
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But the document about JXTA little...and the instruction how to use JXTA not clear and very little...for people like me that the beginer in JXTA...very hard to understand without the good example....the last one is the information about how to setting up java platform(jdk1.6.0) to compile and run JXTA very little.....

thenetworker
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Joined: 2003-06-13
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A dead cat? No, that is not true. Perhaps my killer apps based on JXTA will render those old junk applications based on the last generation technologies dead soon:-)

For those who have technical difficulties with JXTA, I can advise you to do these things:

1) Do all your testing and learning in a controlled environment (For example, I run a rendezvous/relay, multiple peers on a single laptop without any problems.)

2) Make sure you learn thoroughly the discovery and messaging until you know how to send any messages you want. JXTA is crucially based on messaging. The skill of messaging is necessary for you to do debugging when needed.

3) Be patient to print out XML elements and read them as a last resort if you are stymied.

4) Read some source. It is not that hard.

carnado
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Joined: 2007-08-21
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But the document about JXTA little...and the instruction how to use JXTA not clear and very little...for people like me that the beginer in JXTA...very hard to understand without the good example....the last one is the information about how to setting up java platform(jdk1.6.0) to compile and run JXTA very little.....

kevinet
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Joined: 2007-06-01
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you are right
shame on sun
everybody speak about something that doesn't make any sense

asghar
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Joined: 2005-07-26
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Java, Java Community, Sun and open source movement are the beauty and attraction of today’s IT - world. The materialized fairness and openness!
To many eyes, the Sun Microsystems is the recognized and highly respected leader of Java community.

We are here to collaborate, to share our experiences about JXTA.
Therefore we appreciate, if you handle our community with more respect and care.

JXTA is a small but complex technology. Time is needed to fully perceive its huge power, demonstrated in some Sun’s documents, hosted at SDN.

Sure, some improvement is needed to the overall operation of our community. The movement of jxta.org to java.net was surely a right action in this direction ...

Now we all have to support the platform team to release the new version of platform, solving some current troubles. Here I can understand you. … But please be patient as other members are.

Several JXTA-centric [b]killer applications[/b] are under development by our community’s members. So – soon or late - we’ll see, that JXTA is a tiger!

Asghar

asghar
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Joined: 2005-07-26
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Hi everybody at Java Community,

I’m a newcomer to jxta (- THIS corner of our „Java university“! -) and feel that:
Working with JXTA technology is really not easy. Is it so, because…? :
• JXTA is a networking platform. Also a “thing” with a (naturally) low-level property.
• It operates on the top of several different operating systems (for fixed / mobile systems)
• It’s fully integrated with an extensive pool of Java-based technologies, i.e. JTA / JTS, enabling developers to use them easily (nearly) in their any application. No Re-Invent!

That is why JXTA is a protocol stack, consisting of only 6 protocols, independent from each other. Some of them are optional for Implementor of JXTA specification.

JXTA platform depends and communicates intensively with it’s surrounding-world. To develop JXTA application and services better(faster too), developers must have also good understanding and overview of environments, where the targeted JXTA - application or service must operate.
For example it is important to consider:
For the native system, how the configuration parameters are set for all transports, yourApp has to support.

* * *

As I read first time about JXTA on SDN – site one year ago, I knew: this is one of my favorite corner within Java university and I had to wait one year to be hear!
I must say: It’s wasn’t an easy way!
.. But I see also what a great work is done by the community and how much work is done!
Wonderful!

Sure, some improvements are always good! But… We should know:
Each of us is able to improve the work and…
Normally, everybody has to bring it’s part for a better „life“ of our community.

Java is generally for a better life.

Greetings to all members of Java community! (from Germany / NRW)

Sincerely
Asghar

ae6rt
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Joined: 2005-10-25
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There is a segmentation in traditional network programming whereby software developers write network code and network enigneers make sure the packets get delivered. JXTA provides an overlay network that sits on top of the traditional IP network, which provides the JXTA platform an additional routing problem to solve, and JXTA developers an additional set of programming constructs (pipes) to master.

Not knowing much about what you are trying to achieve and how, my suggestion is that if you are serious about JXTA programming, I recommend you master setting up your own private JXTA routing network. The community helped me debug and refine this, and it's proved to be a good starting point in taking control of your JXTA development

http://www.petrovic.org/blog/2006/11/15/a-turnkey-private-jxta-net-demo/

In other words, never rely on the Sun Pubnet to support you in your JXTA development. The Pubnet is often overloaded with experimental packets, as one might expect, and is therefore too often unusable. Out of the box, your demo and tutorials use the Pubnet to connect peers. So what you may be seeing is Pubnet congestion.

You may also find these tips useful in debugging JXTA applications

http://wiki.java.net/bin/view/Jxta/NetworkBasics

chrisdekock
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Joined: 2007-03-07
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Thanks for the reply!

Ok, I'll develop on my LAN.

What happens though, when I have completed my application and want to launch it on the internet?

To which rendezvous should my apps point "out-of-the-box"?

Should I purchase my own static, always-on "super-rendezvous" for my apps to point to? Or is there a seeding URL of dependable public rendezvous available?

tra
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Joined: 2003-06-16
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> Not many real
> commercial P2P products are based on JXTA technology.
> It's a lot difficult to have get customer support
> infomation from neither inter or JXTA newsgroups.
Check http://blogs.sun.com/tra/entry/beyond_the_restfull_vs_restless

> How a scalable commercial P2P product can be
> developed based on JXTA? Is there any comercial
> products winning story out there?
Here is the latest:
http://blog.collanos.com/index.php/2007/03/01/glimpsing-into-the-future-...

>How much the risk
> if pick up JXTA to develop comercial product?
It's a mature open-source project with friendly license and
community :-)

B.
>
>
> Any SUN JXTA platform developer could give an insight
> view of the above questions?
>
> I guess the goal of JXTA is targeting on comercial
> market, NOT student project.

chrisdekock
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Joined: 2007-03-07
Points: 0

I am very excited about JXTA technology. I have read and studied a great deal so far.
The problem is that I cannot get any JXTA examples or applications to work! I have tried(from my home, work, friends):

-JXTA shell (set up to point to the default rendezvous seeding URL)
-MyJXTA
-JXTA iView (Network viewer)
-Zim-pro

None of these apps seem to discover any peers! (OK the network viewer sometimes pick up jxta.org rendezvous and some surrounding edge peers, but it takes 30min-1hour). I have a fast adsl connection at home on which skype, multiplayer games etc work fine. I do not have any firewall with just a adsl router between me and the internet.

I was expecting to run the shell, run rdvstatus and immediately see a rendezvous connection(I mean, it knows who its looking for) run peers -r and in a few seconds see hundreds of JXTA peers.

The fact that I sometimes get a rendezvous connection and if I'm very lucky some peers, shows that it must be the lack of JXTA peers/Rendezvous on the internet.

I'm looking for solutions as I really want to dabble in JXTA.

Is there other well known public Rendezvous peers I can point my apps to? (Other than those in http://rdv.jxtahosts.net/cgi-bin/rendezvous.cgi?2)

Am I horribly incorrect in saying there is a lack of public rendezvous peers and also currently not too many jxta edge peers acting as rendezvous? I am currently running the visual Jxta network tool. It's been running for 4hours. It found the jxta.org rendezvous and about 10 surrounding peers with no link to other rendezvous - how will my JXTA peer ever find my friend in the UK's peer?

Message was edited by: chrisdekock

Message was edited by: chrisdekock