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Re: GSM or CDMA

11 replies [Last post]
Anonymous

CDMA carriers normally do not support J2ME development as
enthusiastically as GSM ones. Some of them (VIVO, in Brazil, for
example) even ask Java runtime to be removed from their devices, and
BREW runtime be installed instead.

Without any other further info, I would go for GSM. But of course there
are other variables as: size of CDMA / GSM market, coverage, operator
support, etc.

Daniel
Forum Nokia

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Sent: Thursday, February 08, 2007 1:31 PM
To: KVM-INTEREST@JAVA.SUN.COM
Subject: GSM or CDMA

Hi,

If I want to use J2ME development for my smartphone app. dev. project ,
is there any preference whether I should use a CDMA (EV DO svc) or GSM
(GPRS) service ??

We need to develop a prototype for a customer that will monitor a
realtime video feed on the cell phone and customer has ask for
suggestions on what Transport (GSM, EVDO)should be used .

Also folks, if you can suggest a good smartphone device for video,
that will be highly valueable. Any personal exepriences sharing will be
appreciated.

Thx
QM
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Daniel Rocha

Again, this depends on the market. In Europe, Symbian (Nokia S60 and
UIQ) for sure. In the US, Windows Mobile seems stronger.

Daniel

-----Original Message-----
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owner-kvm-interest@JAVA.SUN.COM
Sent: Thursday, February 08, 2007 2:41 PM
To: KVM-INTEREST@JAVA.SUN.COM
Subject: Re: GSM or CDMA

Can you suggest a good device.

Which Operating System : MS Windows Based or Symbian or anyother

Thanks
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qwikm
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Joined: 2007-02-07

OK so you mean J2ME based smartphone software over windows mobile. This is fine.

Any particular devise that is kind of 'friendly to J2ME (supports HTP, RTSP etc and has a better performance ?)

Sorry for asking these pointed questions , but I am looking for a good prototype and performance (for J2ME code ) is a factor.

Thx
QM

jozart
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Joined: 2003-11-23

For Java ME development, I'd advise you to stay away from Symbian or Windows Mobile.

For both of these platforms, native apps are preferable -- and you'll be competing against them on these platforms in any event. In addition, even though MIDP has been an integral part of Symbian for some time, the Symbian implementation is somewhat uniquely flavored, which makes Symbian a bad choice if your aim is to develop a MIDlet that looks and functions great on a wide array of handsets. On Windows Mobile the Java VM is generally not included and the end user is often responsible for installing one:(

For Java development for Cingular users I recommend one of the newer Sony Ericsson JP-7 handsets. A K800i or K790a, for example.

The Sony Ericsson handsets support on-device debugging as well as many of the optional JSRs, making it a great development platform. Multimedia support is also a strong point of the Sony Ericsson handsets.

See developer.sonyericsson.com

For Java development for Sprint (CDMA) users, I would recommend just about any of the newer Sprint handsets. They are all very powerful and they tend to be well vetted by Sprint -- so that a MIDlet developed for one handset has more than a fighting chance of running on many of the other Sprint handsets.

See developer.sprint.com

I also suggest you look at the list of handsets supported by Google's Maps and GMail MIDlets, as well as the Opera Mini MIDlet. Better yet, since you mentioned video, I suggest you look at the list of handsets compatible with MobiTV's MIDlet.

Furthermore, if your application is streaming video, I suggest you compare your MIDlet solution to a couple of other options:

(1) RTSP/3GP video served to the handset's browser and rendered by the native media player (e.g., RealPlayer). This works pretty nicely on my Sprint handset. I can even stream video from my PC to my handset using Apple's Darwin Streaming Server. By the way, I think CDMA handsets may require less end-user intervention to configure streaming then GSM handsets. In particular, I didn't have to configure a streaming access point on my Sprint handset (because there are no access points, at least not visible to the end user).

(2) Flash-based video. Flash is a great vehicle for delivering video to PCs, and FlashLite 2.x supports video.

--
Joe Bowbeer

terrencebarr
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Joined: 2004-03-04

Generally the WTK (and, by implication because it uses the same emulator underneath, Netbeans Mobility) is considered the standard for Java ME mobility application development.

-- Terrence

terrencebarr
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Joined: 2004-03-04

Agree. One should definitely not target a particular Java ME implentation. On the topic of developing portable and consistent applications across the range of devices in the market today and in the future here are two worthwhile articles:

https://meapplicationdevelopers.dev.java.net/fragmentation.html

http://developers.sun.com/techtopics/mobility/reference/techart/design_g...

-- Terrence

qwikm
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Joined: 2007-02-07

I assume any standard J2ME code is the one that will work on J2ME Emulator ..correct ?

terrencebarr
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Joined: 2004-03-04

Of course, it is important to realize that the higher-end Nokia and SonyEricsson platforms are all based on Symbian. Symbian has been a strong supporter of Java ME and both Nokia S60 as well as SonyEricsson UIQ devices are good Java ME platforms. Each has it's unique features and quirks but generally work quite well.

As for streaming video there are a number of articles and examples on the web if you google for "Java ME streaming video", for example:

http://today.java.net/pub/a/today/2006/08/22/experiments-in-streaming-ja...

-- Terrence

jozart
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Joined: 2003-11-23

Right, I do agree that Symbian's Java ME works. This is a great thing if, say, you've already developed a portable MIDlet -- because it will probably "just run" on Series 60 Symbian handsets, too. (Or, realistically, only minor tweaks may be needed.)

I would not focus my MIDlet development efforts on Symbian, however, for the reasons I outlined. A MIDlet developed for Symbian is not as likely to run well on other non-Symbian handsets -- and may not compete well (on Symbian handsets) against the best native apps.

As for Sony Ericsson's UIQ Symbian handsets, I think it's confusing to describe this as "high end" in a discussion of Java ME because their Java implementation is generally less advanced than that of Sony Ericsson's non-Symbian handsets. They don't support on-device debugging, for example. They are also fairly low-volume handsets and have a unique GUI that is not representative of most handsets -- making them an even less desirable *focus* for Java ME development efforts. (Still, if you do your homework then you can develop portable MIDlets that will "just work" on UIQ handsets, too.)

--
Joe Bowbeer
Pervasive JME in Practice

Daniel Rocha

Cost-wise, yes, correct.

However you should first do some research on your target devices'
support for Mobile Media API, the video format of your choice and video
download method (HTTP vs RTSP).

Daniel

-----Original Message-----
From: A mailing list for KVM discussion
[mailto:KVM-INTEREST@JAVA.SUN.COM] On Behalf Of ext
owner-kvm-interest@JAVA.SUN.COM
Sent: Thursday, February 08, 2007 2:14 PM
To: KVM-INTEREST@JAVA.SUN.COM
Subject: Re: GSM or CDMA

Daniel,

Thanks for taking time to respond.

Just as an FYI, we started with BREW to evaluate video monitoring
application prototype project. However a $400 upfront cost for licensing
(and our tight fistedness on the other hand) gave us a feeling that we
are not a good fit for BREW.

Correct me if I am wrong, but we can implement the same on J2ME (as in
BREW environment) but with a lesser licensing cost per device...correct
?

QM
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qwikm
Offline
Joined: 2007-02-07

Can you suggest a good device.

Which Operating System : MS Windows Based or Symbian or anyother

Thanks

qwikm
Offline
Joined: 2007-02-07

Daniel,

Thanks for taking time to respond.

Just as an FYI, we started with BREW to evaluate video monitoring application prototype project. However a $400 upfront cost for licensing (and our tight fistedness on the other hand) gave us a feeling that we are not a good fit for BREW.

Correct me if I am wrong, but we can implement the same on J2ME (as in BREW environment) but with a lesser licensing cost per device...correct ?

QM