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Some questions to JXMapViewer

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ylzhao
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Joined: 2004-08-22

Hi,
I have some questions to JXMapViewer:
1. In Joshy's blog: "http://weblogs.java.net/blog/joshy/archive/2006/07/getting_started.html", I run the "WoW Map" Java Webstart link, but can not see the wow map. What's
wrong with it?

2. What is the map zoom levels? Is the top level is zoom level minimum or zoom level maximum? And, does "Zoom In" decrease or increase current zoom level? What I understand is "Zoom In" increase current zoom level and "Zoom Out" decrease current zoom level. However, it seems that JXMapViewerTest demo is inverse.
I need more interpretation on this topic.

3. What is the map directory structure and file structure? For example,
direcotry "0": 0_0_0.jpg
direcotry "1": 0_0_1.jpg 0_1_1.jpg 1_0_1.jpg 1_1_1.jpg
etc.
If a file named as "x_y_z.jpg", what is x, y and z meaning?
This question is related to question 2. Because the zoom level determines the file names.

Thanks!

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Bill Snyder

>
> BTW, there is potentially another solution which I believe is entirely
> legal (and ethical!), though of course, I am not a lawyer.
>
> It goes something like this. We have JavaScript (or a flavor thereof) in
> Java 6. What keeps us from creating a browser environment for hosting the
> Google Maps JavaScript APIs? We'd have to provide an XMLHttpRequest object
> (check! in the SwingX-WS project). We'd have to provide some DOM
> implementation that updates the Swing UI rather than a normal DOM document.
> We'd probably have to provide a couple other core services. But then we
> could download and use Google Maps directly.
>
> Anybody up to giving it a shot?

That sounds like a slick solution. Where's the source for the map viewer?
[att1.html]

Romain GUY

We thought about that one during the development of Aerith. But it
seems like an awful lot of work to come up with a heavy solution.
Wouldn't it be easier to use another maps provider? It does not have
to be Google.

On 18 janv. 07, at 17:33, Bill Snyder wrote:

> BTW, there is potentially another solution which I believe is
> entirely legal (and ethical!), though of course, I am not a lawyer.
>
> It goes something like this. We have JavaScript (or a flavor
> thereof) in Java 6. What keeps us from creating a browser
> environment for hosting the Google Maps JavaScript APIs? We'd have
> to provide an XMLHttpRequest object (check! in the SwingX-WS
> project). We'd have to provide some DOM implementation that updates
> the Swing UI rather than a normal DOM document. We'd probably have
> to provide a couple other core services. But then we could download
> and use Google Maps directly.
>
> Anybody up to giving it a shot?
>
>
> That sounds like a slick solution. Where's the source for the map
> viewer?
>
>

--
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Joshua Marinacci

> It must be some kind of telepathy as I was reading the Terms of
> Use. They sounds more liberal than Google. But at this point I'm
> curious to know why Romain & co. didn't use Yahoo! for Aerith -
> maybe they know that there's some sort of problem here too?

Yahoo has two map servers. One which renders a single image using an
odd projection and another which uses tiles. I originally wrote the
JXMapViewer using the single image API but I could never make the
tiles line up properly. Their projection wasn't linear at all. Their
tile API, on the other hand, works perfectly but has the same
restrictions as Google's.

- Josh

- Blasting forth in three part harmony!

[att1.html]

Romain GUY

Also note that we never ran into this problem with Aerith (and we did
send a freakin' large number of requests at times.)

On 13 janv. 07, at 19:37, jdnc-interest@javadesktop.org wrote:

> On Jan 12, 2007, at 14:48 , Romain GUY wrote:
>
>> Web browsers do send things in the HTTP requests headers that might
>> be used by Google to filter requests.
>
> Yes, I know this. My question was meant in the following way: Why
> is it seen as "bad" to do the requests by a Java Client? To overrun
> the critical load of the tile servers is possible independent of
> the technology used. It is possible to do this with a Java program
> or a simple "wget", but also with a browser. IMO the only
> reasonable constraint is a maximum number of tiles per time interval.
> [Message sent by forum member 'krabat' (krabat)]
>
> http://forums.java.net/jive/thread.jspa?messageID=194179
>
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krabat
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Joined: 2007-01-11

> Also note that we never ran into this problem with
> Aerith (and we did
> send a freakin' large number of requests at times.)

Did you also use the Google satellite tiles in Aerith?
I've had the IP blocking only with the satellite tiles, not with the map or transparent tiles. Maybe because the data volume of a satellite tile is much larger than that of a map tile in average.

krabat
Offline
Joined: 2007-01-11

On Jan 12, 2007, at 14:48 , Romain GUY wrote:

> Web browsers do send things in the HTTP requests headers that might
> be used by Google to filter requests.

Yes, I know this. My question was meant in the following way: Why is it seen as "bad" to do the requests by a Java Client? To overrun the critical load of the tile servers is possible independent of the technology used. It is possible to do this with a Java program or a simple "wget", but also with a browser. IMO the only reasonable constraint is a maximum number of tiles per time interval.

Romain GUY

I guess it simply enforces their data usage restrictions. When you
write a web app that requests Google Maps tiles, you are better off
using Google's API anyway. On the contrary, when you are writing a
non web-app you can't use their API.

On 13 janv. 07, at 19:37, jdnc-interest@javadesktop.org wrote:

> On Jan 12, 2007, at 14:48 , Romain GUY wrote:
>
>> Web browsers do send things in the HTTP requests headers that might
>> be used by Google to filter requests.
>
> Yes, I know this. My question was meant in the following way: Why
> is it seen as "bad" to do the requests by a Java Client? To overrun
> the critical load of the tile servers is possible independent of
> the technology used. It is possible to do this with a Java program
> or a simple "wget", but also with a browser. IMO the only
> reasonable constraint is a maximum number of tiles per time interval.
> [Message sent by forum member 'krabat' (krabat)]
>
> http://forums.java.net/jive/thread.jspa?messageID=194179
>
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>

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Fabrizio Giudici

On Jan 11, 2007, at 22:21 , jdnc-interest@javadesktop.org wrote:

> "
> This has absolutely nothing to do with Sun. It is a matter of
> Google's licensing terms. Everyone (even open source software) must
> comply with their terms or else not use their servers. That is why
> we are working with NASA to get some really great satellite data
> served up for free."
>
> Yep, but NASA Provider only have Satellite Image not roads. This
> can be an problem for some applications.

Well, better than nothing... :-(

--
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lbrucet
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Joined: 2006-10-03

"Hmm... I don't think sales department are interested in giving free
rights to opensource software. :( I think I'll remove the code from
the repository tomorrow. That's quite annoying.
"
Is a pity that Google and sun they not agree.

Lluis

joshy
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Joined: 2003-07-02

This has absolutely nothing to do with Sun. It is a matter of Google's licensing terms. Everyone (even open source software) must comply with their terms or else not use their servers. That is why we are working with NASA to get some really great satellite data served up for free.

lbrucet
Offline
Joined: 2006-10-03

"
This has absolutely nothing to do with Sun. It is a matter of Google's licensing terms. Everyone (even open source software) must comply with their terms or else not use their servers. That is why we are working with NASA to get some really great satellite data served up for free."

Yep, but NASA Provider only have Satellite Image not roads. This can be an problem for some applications.

Lluis

joshy
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Joined: 2003-07-02

I agree. Sadly this is the situation with vector mapping data. You will not find free vector data from anyone due to the great expense of producing it. The exception is OpenStreeMaps.org, which I have great hopes for. It lets individuals create their own maps using GPS systems.

lbrucet
Offline
Joined: 2006-10-03

Well. I will see OpenStreeMaps.org. I wait that can't be a problem for Europe maps.

I will advice.

Lluís

krabat
Offline
Joined: 2007-01-11

I wonder why it is seen as a difference by Google whether I access the tile servers through a browser versus accessing it e. g. with the help of a Java program, assumed I only ask for a few tiles. I well understand that there is a limitation of tiles per day.
I could write a script for calling the browser with different adresses in a loop, save the pages automatically and cut out and join the tiles with imagemagick or something else. This is some work, but not very hard to do. But whether I do it in this way or per JXMapViewer or similar should not make any difference for the servers, provided the number of tiles accessed is the same.

Romain GUY

Web browsers do send things in the HTTP requests headers that might
be used by Google to filter requests.

On 12 janv. 07, at 14:45, jdnc-interest@javadesktop.org wrote:

> I wonder why it is seen as a difference by Google whether I access
> the tile servers through a browser versus accessing it e. g. with
> the help of a Java program, assumed I only ask for a few tiles. I
> well understand that there is a limitation of tiles per day.
> I could write a script for calling the browser with different
> adresses in a loop, save the pages automatically and cut out and
> join the tiles with imagemagick or something else. This is some
> work, but not very hard to do. But whether I do it in this way or
> per JXMapViewer or similar should not make any difference for the
> servers, provided the number of tiles accessed is the same.
> [Message sent by forum member 'krabat' (krabat)]
>
> http://forums.java.net/jive/thread.jspa?messageID=193812
>
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Fabrizio Giudici

On Jan 12, 2007, at 14:48 , Romain GUY wrote:

> Web browsers do send things in the HTTP requests headers that might
> be used by Google to filter requests.

For instance the Agent, that clearly distinguishes a regular browser
from a Java client. At this point the inavoidable question: as we got
to a shared point that Google doesn't want external accesses, why
they don't drop Java clients? I mean, I know that the Agent stuff can
be cheated, but it would be a sort of warning to users...

-
Fabrizio Giudici, Ph.D. - Java Architect, Project Manager
Tidalwave s.a.s. - "We make Java work. Everywhere."
weblogs.java.net/blog/fabriziogiudici - www.tidalwave.it/blog
Fabrizio.Giudici@tidalwave.it - mobile: +39 348.150.6941

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krabat
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Joined: 2007-01-11

> "For individual users, Google Maps, including local
> search results,
> maps, and photographic imagery, is made available for
> your personal,
> non-commercial use only. For business users, Google
> Maps is made
> available for your internal use only and may not be
> commercially
> redistributed, except that map data may be accessed
> and displayed by
> using the Google Maps API pursuant to the API terms
> and conditions."

As it is written, only the first sentence is applicable for private use. And if I use JXMapViewer, I don't use the GM API, so it's terms of use aren't applicable either. So I don't recognize a statement which states that it is forbidden to make HTTP requests to the tile servers directly for private use.

joshy
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Joined: 2003-07-02

There is no Google-Sun agreement. We flew under the radar for the JavaOne demo. After JavaOne I attempted to work out an arrangement with Google but was not able to come to any agreement, which is why we removed the GoogleMaps tile provider before releasing the code and began working on NASA map support. It is my understanding that you are never legally allowed to talk to Google's tile server directly, but I'm not a lawyer nor a Google employee. You really need to talk to them about it. I know they have some sort of commercial map sales department. You might have more luck talking to them.

Fabrizio Giudici

On Jan 11, 2007, at 17:39 , jdnc-interest@javadesktop.org wrote:

> There is no Google-Sun agreement. We flew under the radar for the
> JavaOne demo. After JavaOne I attempted to work out an arrangement
> with Google but was not able to come to any agreement, which is why
> we removed the GoogleMaps tile provider before releasing the code
> and began working on NASA map support. It is my understanding that
> you are never legally allowed to talk to Google's tile server
> directly, but I'm not a lawyer nor a Google employee. You really
> need to talk to them about it. I know they have some sort of
> commercial map sales department. You might have more luck talking
> to them.

Hmm... I don't think sales department are interested in giving free
rights to opensource software. :-( I think I'll remove the code from
the repository tomorrow. That's quite annoying.

Is there a list of free map providers (are there?)? While in the
meantime we're all longing for the NASA hi-res stuff to be ready.

--
Fabrizio Giudici, Ph.D. - Java Architect, Project Manager
Tidalwave s.a.s. - "We make Java work. Everywhere."
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joshy
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Joined: 2003-07-02

Sadly you are correct. The truth is that mapping data like what Yahoo and Google have is very very very expensive. The companies that own the data and license it to Google and Yahoo charge a lot of money and have strict licensing terms. My guess is that Google doesn't have the right to give us access to their tile server if they wanted to. As far as I know the only attempt at truly free mapping servers is openstreemap.org. I'm sorry I don't have a better answer. Trust me, it's been very frustrating.

agoubard
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Joined: 2003-10-04

Why not use Yahoo! Map API?
http://developer.yahoo.com/maps/rest/V1/mapImage.html

It's seems to be limited to 50,000 requests per IP per day and forbidden for some kinds of use like not use with data comming from a GPS or sensor device in the last 6 hours.

Fabrizio Giudici

On Jan 17, 2007, at 23:30 , jdnc-interest@javadesktop.org wrote:

> Why not use Yahoo! Map API?
> http://developer.yahoo.com/maps/rest/V1/mapImage.html
>
> It's seems to be limited to 50,000 requests per IP per day and
> forbidden for some kinds of use like not use with data comming from
> a GPS or sensor device in the last 6 hours.
> [Message sent by forum member 'agoubard' (agoubard)]
>
> http://forums.java.net/jive/thread.jspa?messageID=195642
>
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It must be some kind of telepathy as I was reading the Terms of Use.
They sounds more liberal than Google. But at this point I'm curious
to know why Romain & co. didn't use Yahoo! for Aerith - maybe they
know that there's some sort of problem here too?

http://help.yahoo.com/l/us/yahoo/maps/using/maps-24.html
Personal Use Only. You agree to use the Data together with Yahoo!
Maps solely for personal, non-commercial purposes for which you were
licensed, and not for service bureau, time-sharing or other similar
purposes. Accordingly, but subject to the restrictions set forth in
the following paragraphs, you may copy this Data only as necessary
for your personal use to (i) view it on your screen, (ii) print it,
(iii) transfer a copy to a personal electronic device such as a
personal digital assistant; (iv) save it, and (v) transfer a copy, in
html form only, to a third party provided that you do not remove any
copyright notices that appear and do not modify the Data in any way.
You agree not to otherwise reproduce, copy, modify, decompile,
disassemble or reverse engineer any portion of this Data, and may not
otherwise transfer or distribute it in any form, for any purpose,
except to the extent permitted by mandatory laws.

Restrictions. Without limiting the preceding paragraph, you may not
use this Data (a) in the performance of any function of real time
route guidance, vehicle tracking, dispatch, fleet management or
similar applications; or (b) in any other manner not authorized
hereunder. Without limiting the foregoing, this Data shall not be
used with functionality of any devices or systems which include
resident geographic data and/or which enable a continuous or
intermittent (i.e., more frequently than once per minute) position
determination.

--
Fabrizio Giudici, Ph.D. - Java Architect, Project Manager
Tidalwave s.a.s. - "We make Java work. Everywhere."
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rbair
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Joined: 2003-07-08

> It must be some kind of telepathy as I was reading
> the Terms of Use.
> They sounds more liberal than Google. But at this
> point I'm curious
> to know why Romain & co. didn't use Yahoo! for Aerith
> - maybe they
> know that there's some sort of problem here too?

At the time, Yahoo! didn't (and still might not) have a simple tile server. Instead, we had to get a map at a time and stitch them together, which got a bit funky since they weren't using a projection that worked well with tiling and stitching.

I know Josh first tried to use Yahoo!, but afterward switched to Google.

BTW, there is potentially another solution which I believe is entirely legal (and ethical!), though of course, I am not a lawyer.

It goes something like this. We have JavaScript (or a flavor thereof) in Java 6. What keeps us from creating a browser environment for hosting the Google Maps JavaScript APIs? We'd have to provide an XMLHttpRequest object (check! in the SwingX-WS project). We'd have to provide some DOM implementation that updates the Swing UI rather than a normal DOM document. We'd probably have to provide a couple other core services. But then we could download and use Google Maps directly.

Anybody up to giving it a shot?

Richard

Fabrizio Giudici

On Jan 17, 2007, at 23:59 , jdnc-interest@javadesktop.org wrote:

>> It must be some kind of telepathy as I was reading
>> the Terms of Use.
>> They sounds more liberal than Google. But at this
>> point I'm curious
>> to know why Romain & co. didn't use Yahoo! for Aerith
>> - maybe they
>> know that there's some sort of problem here too?
>
> At the time, Yahoo! didn't (and still might not) have a simple tile
> server. Instead, we had to get a map at a time and stitch them
> together, which got a bit funky since they weren't using a
> projection that worked well with tiling and stitching.
>
> I know Josh first tried to use Yahoo!, but afterward switched to
> Google.
>
> BTW, there is potentially another solution which I believe is
> entirely legal (and ethical!), though of course, I am not a lawyer.
>
> It goes something like this. We have JavaScript (or a flavor
> thereof) in Java 6. What keeps us from creating a browser
> environment for hosting the Google Maps JavaScript APIs? We'd have
> to provide an XMLHttpRequest object (check! in the SwingX-WS
> project). We'd have to provide some DOM implementation that updates
> the Swing UI rather than a normal DOM document. We'd probably have
> to provide a couple other core services. But then we could download
> and use Google Maps directly.
>
> Anybody up to giving it a shot?

I was thinking of it, but this would require using a different thing
of JXMapViewer - or, to re-implement it maybe by delegation to
different implementations (the current one and the JS one).

I could probably try how Cobra works with it (it's a Web browser with
JS support). I don't think there are more than 50% chances that it
works; but if it does, this should be a good hint that the JS
approach is good. I won't be able to try before the next weekend. BTW
I'll try with Java 5, as I'm bound to it until Apple releases Java 6
on Mac OS X...

--
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Tidalwave s.a.s. - "We make Java work. Everywhere."
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Fabrizio Giudici

On Jan 11, 2007, at 16:15 , Romain GUY wrote:

> It's against Google's terms of use to hack into the tiles server
> directly. You're normally allowed to use Google Maps tiles only
> through the JavaScript API. What you're doing is therefore just
> plain illegal and that's why they block your IP address :)

Is it possible to have a clarification about this? When Joshua
introduced the JXMapViewer he said that he couldn't reveal the
details of the integration code because of a Google-Sun agreement,
but there were no legal issues about third parties doing it... I'd be
a bit worried as I released blueMarine with working code :-)

--
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Romain GUY

> Is it possible to have a clarification about this? When Joshua
> introduced the JXMapViewer he said that he couldn't reveal the
> details of the integration code because of a Google-Sun agreement,
> but there were no legal issues about third parties doing it... I'd
> be a bit worried as I released blueMarine with working code :-)

I don't remember the specifics but I would say (Josh or some other
people at Sun must confirm this) that Google allowed us to use Google
Maps this way for Aerith when we showed it at JavaOne. One thing is
for sure, we never released the source code of Aerith *with* the
Google Maps tiles provider.

I guess Josh was saying that you could re-implement the tiles
provider if you wanted, but that's your responsability, not
SwingLabs' nor Sun's. You should check out Google Maps terms of use
but I'm afraid they are not allowing such a use of the data.

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Fabrizio Giudici

On Jan 11, 2007, at 16:34 , Romain GUY wrote:

>> Is it possible to have a clarification about this? When Joshua
>> introduced the JXMapViewer he said that he couldn't reveal the
>> details of the integration code because of a Google-Sun agreement,
>> but there were no legal issues about third parties doing it... I'd
>> be a bit worried as I released blueMarine with working code :-)
>
> I don't remember the specifics but I would say (Josh or some other
> people at Sun must confirm this) that Google allowed us to use
> Google Maps this way for Aerith when we showed it at JavaOne. One
> thing is for sure, we never released the source code of Aerith
> *with* the Google Maps tiles provider.
>
> I guess Josh was saying that you could re-implement the tiles
> provider if you wanted, but that's your responsability, not
> SwingLabs' nor Sun's. You should check out Google Maps terms of use
> but I'm afraid they are not allowing such a use of the data.

Unfortunately I don't feel comfortable with legalese.

http://www.google.com/intl/en_ALL/help/terms_local.html

"For individual users, Google Maps, including local search results,
maps, and photographic imagery, is made available for your personal,
non-commercial use only. For business users, Google Maps is made
available for your internal use only and may not be commercially
redistributed, except that map data may be accessed and displayed by
using the Google Maps API pursuant to the API terms and conditions."

It would sound as the Google Maps API constraint is referred to only
for business users. I'd say that writing the code and using it for
personal purposes would not be prohibited. Releasing the code maybe
is a bit more difficult to understand, but probably releasing the
specific module with a separate license referring to the Google Maps
Terms and Conditions (so that others can't use it but for personal,
non-commercial purposes) could be ok. Whom can we ask for a
definitive answer?

--
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Romain GUY

> It would sound as the Google Maps API constraint is referred to
> only for business users. I'd say that writing the code and using it
> for personal purposes would not be prohibited. Releasing the code
> maybe is a bit more difficult to understand, but probably releasing
> the specific module with a separate license referring to the Google
> Maps Terms and Conditions (so that others can't use it but for
> personal, non-commercial purposes) could be ok. Whom can we ask for
> a definitive answer?

From what I read it's not only for non-commercial use but for
*personal* use too. Distributing the application would violate this
second rule. Josh can surely give you the name of the person he was
in contact with at google regarding that problem.

>
>
> --
> Fabrizio Giudici, Ph.D. - Java Architect, Project Manager
> Tidalwave s.a.s. - "We make Java work. Everywhere."
> weblogs.java.net/blog/fabriziogiudici - www.tidalwave.it/blog
> Fabrizio.Giudici@tidalwave.it - mobile: +39 348.150.6941
>
>
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--
Romain GUY
http://jroller.com/page/gfx
http://www.progx.org

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bavarian
Offline
Joined: 2006-11-22

Hi,

wouldn't it be a solution to embed an external browser into Java?
I just came across "Embedding Mozilla in a Java Application using JavaXPCOM": http://developer.mozilla.org/en/docs/JavaXPCOM:Embedding_Mozilla_in_a_Ja...

Has anyone tried that approach? I'm not a pro in this field - so I just wanted to ask if there's anybody around who has already tested that approach.

Regards,
Franz

Fabrizio Giudici

On Feb 28, 2007, at 20:20 , jdnc-interest@javadesktop.org wrote:

> Hi,
>
> wouldn't it be a solution to embed an external browser into Java?
> I just came across "Embedding Mozilla in a Java Application using
> JavaXPCOM": http://developer.mozilla.org/en/docs/
> JavaXPCOM:Embedding_Mozilla_in_a_Java_Application_using_JavaXPCOM
>
> Has anyone tried that approach? I'm not a pro in this field - so I
> just wanted to ask if there's anybody around who has already tested
> that approach.
>
> Regards,
> Franz
> [Message sent by forum member 'bavarian' (bavarian)]
>
> http://forums.java.net/jive/thread.jspa?messageID=205686

I tried to use a Java-based web browser with JavaScript support
(Cobra) with no luck (I did a half-an-hour test, that is if it
doesn't in 30 minutes I give up) and it didn't worked. I'm
considering working again on it only as a backup plan, at the moment
I'm more interested in integrating Visual Earth and other maps that
_seem_ free from license issues. The point is that with JXMapViewer
(or with a Java browser) you are much more free to do cool things
such as using layered panes and such, a thing that you can't do with
a native browser. Of course, this depends on what you want to do.

--
Fabrizio Giudici, Ph.D. - Java Architect, Project Manager
Tidalwave s.a.s. - "We make Java work. Everywhere."
weblogs.java.net/blog/fabriziogiudici - www.tidalwave.it/blog
Fabrizio.Giudici@tidalwave.it - mobile: +39 348.150.6941

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krabat
Offline
Joined: 2007-01-11

Late, but here are some answers:
2): Zoom = 1 is the most detailed sight.
In Google Maps zoom = 17 shows the whole world (up to 85,..° N/S); in Satellite mode this is zoom = 19
3): normally x = longitude, y = latitude, z = zoom

krabat
Offline
Joined: 2007-01-11

I too have some questions concerning JXMapViewer.

(1) I have used JXMapViewer for showing Google Maps in Map and Satellite mode. For Sat mode i've written my own little TileProviderInfo.getTileUrl() method based on Google Maps' Javascript code to create the "qrst" adresses. I'm sure this is done in the right way. For Map mode all is fine, and Sat mode also does run and shows the right tiles, but after ~5 minutes of usage in Sat mode Google blocks my IP, so I have to wait 24 hours for the next test. I see that the software is using a cache for the tiles, so why do I get this problem? My application window size is 800x800 pixel, so not really much larger than a browser window.

(2) Are there any samples for the use of JXMapViewer.setMapOverlay()? I want to overlay my own maps with the transparent Google tiles.

Romain GUY

It's against Google's terms of use to hack into the tiles server
directly. You're normally allowed to use Google Maps tiles only
through the JavaScript API. What you're doing is therefore just plain
illegal and that's why they block your IP address :)

On 11 janv. 07, at 16:07, jdnc-interest@javadesktop.org wrote:

> I too have some questions concerning JXMapViewer.
>
> (1) I have used JXMapViewer for showing Google Maps in Map and
> Satellite mode. For Sat mode i've written my own little
> TileProviderInfo.getTileUrl() method based on Google Maps'
> Javascript code to create the "qrst" adresses. I'm sure this is
> done in the right way. For Map mode all is fine, and Sat mode also
> does run and shows the right tiles, but after ~5 minutes of usage
> in Sat mode Google blocks my IP, so I have to wait 24 hours for the
> next test. I see that the software is using a cache for the tiles,
> so why do I get this problem? My application window size is 800x800
> pixel, so not really much larger than a browser window.
>
> (2) Are there any samples for the use of JXMapViewer.setMapOverlay
> ()? I want to overlay my own maps with the transparent Google tiles.
> [Message sent by forum member 'krabat' (krabat)]
>
> http://forums.java.net/jive/thread.jspa?messageID=193349
>
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> To unsubscribe, e-mail: jdnc-unsubscribe@jdnc.dev.java.net
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>

--
Romain GUY
http://jroller.com/page/gfx
http://www.progx.org

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krabat
Offline
Joined: 2007-01-11

Oh, I didn't know this (and will never try again ;-)). But I wonder how the Google Server is able to distinguish whether a Javascript or a Java program has sent the HTTP request for a tile?