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Chapter 3: Crown Jewels

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invalidname
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Chapter 3 looks at Java's innate strengths, though it concludes those strengths may not be today what they once were. Bruce Tate writes "I get enormous productivity jolts out of Java's incredible community, and countless open source projects. The open standards and the JVM mean that my knowledge, and my applications, can move from place to place. Java's been tremendously successful. You've seen my views about why it was popular. If you're to understand what might possibly come after Java, you need to ask questions about Java's continued success:

* What makes Java hip, and draw such a wide variety of people?
* How has the open source community thrived, in times, despite Sun and the power vendors?
* What are the indispensable technical underpinnings that make Java successful?
* What makes Java so adaptable that programmers can build everything from web sites to databases?"

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javakiddy
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Surely to qualify as a 'myth' something has to be a well held view or opinion?

invalidname
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Tate concludes Chapter 3's assessments of Java's strengths by stating a set of what he calls "myths" that could lead to Java's undoing. They are:

1. Java's leadership is unassailable

2. Java is a great applications language

3. Java is the most productive language

4. Commercial Interests Drive Most Java Innovation

5. Big Things Usually Come from Likely Sources

What do you think of these claims? They're explored in upcoming chapters, but right now, do these seem like "myths", and if they are, what does that mean for Java?

smartinumcp
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Java was seen as a big breakthrough for the amount of time was dedicated to garbage collection, platform specificity in development. If someone can make a new language, standard that reduces the current complexity of expressing business, algorithms outside of the code that will be a true competitor.

tobega
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I think the single most important advantage of Java is that my debugging time has been so drastically reduced. I only now have to find errors of logic, not errors of omission, like memory leaks, memory overwrites, etc.

If Java could take that foundation and move with it, becoming more itself, that would be great.

I wrote some ideas here: http://www.javalobby.org/java/forums/t53777.html#91953068

Of course, the platform independence and the JCP are important factors, too.

(Confession: I haven't read the book)

invalidname
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Chapter 3 devotes one section each to what it calls Java's "crown jewels":
* Language and JVM Design
* The Internet
* Enterprise Integration
* Community

Are these advantages unique to Java? What do you think of Tate's analyses of them? Can another language do them better?

smartinumcp
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Python and Perl have nearly the same advantages. The key difference I've seen in Java is the ability to deploy to multiple environments quickly vs a nightmare of library/classpath issues. Not to say there are not classpath issues but the lack of native libraries compared to c/c++ or perl are a real plus.