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Make interacting with Sun easier and less formal!

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cowwoc
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Joined: 2003-08-24
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My personal view is that people complain about Java not being open-source because:

1) They want a quicker turn-around time between filing of bugs/RFE and the release of a fix.

2) They want to be able to compile the source-code.

I have recently tried compiling the JDK 1.4.2 from the source-code and let me tell you, it is *far* from trivial. Sun can retain control of Java, design and interfaces for as long as it wants (I don't think many people will argue with that) but it *has* to make it easier to use to build the source-code, submit patches and have them merged into Sun's main-branch for monthly releases. That's all we're asking for.

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desalvionjr
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Joined: 2004-10-29
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Do you know how to make spam filters with java?
If you do create one for me publish a download to the internet.
and name it spam>B

and send a link to the dowload for me.

desalvionjr
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Joined: 2004-10-29
Points: 0

And my e-mail address is nick@teampax.com

rickknowles
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Joined: 2004-05-18
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There is one other reason, but I doubt it is one that most people would complain about, cause it doesn't affect most of them: fear of legal/financial penalties for doing something as simple as mistakenly implementing an interface the wrong way.

As a servlet container implementor, I've found sun's approach of "if it doesn't pass the compatibility test kit we'll take you to court" to be as far from open source philosophy as you can get. Java is a *far* less complex beast than the linux kernel (150MB+ of source code), and it seems to manage to deal with all the problems Java does (ie potential non-compatibility, etc) without resorting to legal and financial big-company-screwing-over of the little guy.

But you're certainly right about the quicker turn around time - I've been waiting since April just to get a download link for the Test Compatibility Kit for JSR154, and I finished signing the contract nearly a month ago.

It's the first time I've ever seriously wondered if it possibly to have a nuclear holocaust confined to a single company's office. I mean, is there no-one even answering email there?

robilad
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Joined: 2004-05-05
Points: 0

> There is one other reason, but I doubt it is one that
> most people would complain about, cause it doesn't
> affect most of them: fear of legal/financial
> penalties for doing something as simple as mistakenly
> implementing an interface the wrong way.

Ah yes, the joys of SCSL[1]. No wonder Microsoft didn't want to touch Sun's Java 1.2 code after they saw that license ;)

rabbe
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Joined: 2003-06-14
Points: 0

> from trivial. Sun can retain control of Java, design
> and interfaces for as long as it wants (I don't think
> many people will argue with that) but it *has* to
> make it easier to use to build the source-code,
> submit patches and have them merged into Sun's
> main-branch for monthly releases. That's all we're
> asking for.

Good ideas, but it's not all people are asking for. Some of the loudest are calling for a J2SE license change to permit bundling on various linux distros. I don't like the idea of a license change myself.

I do like the idea of patch submission and frequent development builds as you mention, but I'd like general availability to be limited (maybe quarterly for maintenance releases and annually for dot releases) in order to avoid version control issues in IT departments and on home users machines.