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Quell the fear that Java will be acquired by a non-benevolent despot

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johnreynolds
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Joined: 2003-06-12

Sun has been a great steward for Java, but what if (at some time in the distant future) Java gets bought by a non-benevolent despot.

We need something like the Nature Conservancy's approach to protecting wild places in America. The Nature Conservancy either buys special places, or they purchase "conservation easements" that limit how the land can be used in the future.

I'd like Sun to figure out some way to couple Java to licensing that would keep a future owner from hurting the Java community.

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linuxhippy
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Joined: 2004-01-07

Defenitive!

Thats the problem of SUN's not breakable will to make java not open source.
In fact they own all the code and could do whatever the want - no problem in term of law.

Thats why I am using free software like GCJ/GIJ to test my programs against it and do NOT use swing, instead I use a toolkit called lwvcl which stands under GPL.

As long as Java is ok I run my software on java about 5x faster than on GCJ but if they behave ugly many guys will switch to GCJ very fast.

And don't thing that IBM or BEA are a solution, they have licensed nearly their whole classpath from sun, so no luck at all!

khinboon
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Joined: 2004-07-13

I'm new here :) and because I'm here, I'm a big big fan of Java...

anyway... correct me if i am wrong or too naive... i think thats out of our control... what we can help java is by producing your best product in the j factor and not m or other factors... till now, i notice not much software companies wouldn't be daring enough to produce a retail products in java (esp. in the windows platform)... its hard for me to find a pure java products out there... only if someone dare to take the risk (i don't see it as a risk anyway), and to lead the way... being the role model for others... have u ever thought of a photoshop or macromedia flash mx alike in java? etc etc... i think this will benefit java by bringing profit in (directly and indirectly... but i dunno how... its all feeling...) Right now, wads in my mind is to produce a forum software in jsp that is as powerful as vbulletin... i have not succeed in producing a great software since i know programming and this is my first one... i will put in alot of effort on doing this and i always look at this as my first step to be those who are daring enough to produce something huge (maybe medium for my case or small) using java... wish me luck... ;)

jwenting
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Joined: 2003-12-02

> factor and not m or other factors... till now, i
> notice not much software companies wouldn't be daring
> enough to produce a retail products in java (esp. in
> the windows platform)... its hard for me to find a
> pure java products out there... only if someone dare

there's quite a few out there, but mainly for use within the IT industry.
The problem is mainly the distribution and installation of a JVM which adds another step in the installation process of the software which is a hurdle.

> all feeling...) Right now, wads in my mind is to
> produce a forum software in jsp that is as powerful
> as vbulletin... i have not succeed in producing a

This forum is a JSP application :)
There's several more out there.

fgoret
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Joined: 2003-10-20

And what if Sun itself becomes a non-benevolent despot? They need money to stay afloat... and Java is their greatest product.

rabbe
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Joined: 2003-06-14

The .Net runtime is free. Because of that, Sun really can't charge for the runtime. If they did, .Net or another competing technology would become standard.

robilad
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Joined: 2004-05-05

> The .Net runtime is free. Because of that, Sun
> really can't charge for the runtime. If they did,
> .Net or another competing technology would become
> standard.

A while ago, Sun's C compilers for Solaris were also free as in beer. And then suddendly they weren't. Despite that there was a free software gcc around.