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Biswajit Sarkar

Biswajit Sarkar is an electrical engineer with specialization in Programmable Industrial Automation. He has been associated with a wide variety of automation projects including controls for special purpose machines , blast furnace charge control, large air pollution control systems, controls for cogeneration plants in sugar factories, supervisory control for small hydel plants, turbine governors, and substation automation including associated SCADA.

Currently Biswajit consults on Industrial Automation and Java ME based applications. Biswajit has also taught a specially designed course on Java for MS and Ph.D. students as well as post doctoral fellows at the Center for Coastal Physical Oceanography, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, Virginia (USA). Biswajit is the author of "LWUIT 1.1 for Java ME Developers" published by PACKT Publishing.

 

Articles

Discover how to use some of the new and enhanced features in LWUIT version 1.3
This article describes how to apply the Payment API (JSR 229) in JavaME applications. The example application enables lenders to provide microcredit for projects.
Animation is increasingly being used by desktop and mobile applications to provide a better user experience, bringing the user's attention to changes in content or context. In this article, Biswajit Sarkar introduces the animation and transition features provided by LWUIT for mobile Java...
The LWUIT brings a great deal of customizability to Java ME GUIs, offering the ability to combine specific combinations of colors, fonts, images and opacity into styles and themes, and have GUI elements use those settings. LWUIT also offers a SwingX-like Painter for applying custom painting across...
Java ME may promise consistent behavior across devices, but not consistent appearance, which makes it difficult to create GUIs that work everywhere. The Lightweight User Interface Toolkit addresses this problem by taking a Swing-like approach and rendering all components in Java. In this article...
GUIs vary from one Java ME implementation to another, from attractive and functional to nearly unusable. What's a developer to do? In this article, Biswajit Sarkar makes the case for developing your own text display and menu class by custom painting a Canvas, thereby delivering the same...
Java to assembly is one thing, but what about calling Java from assembly language? Biswajit Sarkar says he's worked on assembly programs where the most effective way to incorporate higher-level functionality was to create and invoke a JVM. In this article, he shows how it's done.
SVG Tiny Profile is spec'ed for Java ME in JSR 226, and it will be a requirement in upcoming ME handsets. In this article, Biswajit Sarkar has an introduction to drawing, loading, and animating SVG images in ME.
Record stores not enough? Some Java ME devices support JSR 75, an API that allows for a deeper level of file-system access. But even though it's spec'ed by a JSR, its implementation across devices offers a variety of hazards to watch out for. In this article, Biswajit Sarkar takes a real-world...
Text entry is difficult on phones, so it's possible your Java ME users will want to copy and paste to save some keypresses. However, the ME TextBox doesn't provide this functionality out of the box. Biswajit Sarkar shows you how to implement it yourself.
Your data's on the desktop, and you've got a mobile. Not a problem. By combining an ME midlet with an EE servlet running on the desktop, you can retrieve desktop data, send it to the phone, and work with it there. Biswajit Sarkar offers a simple example of how this arrangement can work.
Nearly everything written about Java Native Interface (JNI) assumes that your native code will be written in C or an offshoot like C++ or Objective-C. But this isn't the only option. For high performance and close-to-the-metal coding, you can call assembly language from JNI. Biswajit Sarkar...