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What version of Java do you expect to be using at the end of 2007?

1.4 or earlier
7% (129 votes)
5.0
24% (429 votes)
6.0
49% (874 votes)
7.0
17% (306 votes)
Something else (please comment)
1% (23 votes)
I don't plan to be using Java by then
2% (33 votes)
Total votes: 1794

Comments

I like 1.6

I'm running Java 1.6 on my server right now and I like it.
Not sure what Java 7 will bring us, but I'll use it even if just for the better VM

As for the new language features, you can generally still get old code to work just fine.
Nobody is holding a gun to your head forcing you to use the new language features.

I like 1.6

Great, botched that one

Which version of java

I think I will use 1.7 god i hate marketing ploys!

Pretty much all of them

Java 7.0 for personal projects and experimentation because I can and I love using the latest and greatest. I used Java 6.0 since around build 40 and was very happy with its stability even then. Java 6.0 for new open source stuff I write at least until 7.0 is released and available for a bit of time. Java 1.4 for work, because that's what we have to use. I hope we've moved on to 5.0 by end of next year but I'm guessing it's not going to happen by then.

Need bettter desktop support

I will be using Java 6, because even though some of the faults outlined here are true the language and platform as a whole are improving significantly. One thing mentioned here is that Sun has dropped support for important things - I agree. JavaCOMM is buggy and I had to drop using it and write my own JNI bindings for Windows to access the serial port. JMF had tremendous potential, but it was never finished and fixed properly. Sun has made efforts to improve Java on the desktop, but how can Java programs truly compete when there is no access to modems/fax devices, scanners, any USB or IEEE1394 devices, cameras, MP3 players, CD/DVD burners, etc. ? (Not to mention that there still seem to be significant issues with printing.) The JOGL project has given us access to modern graphics hardware - that's a positive step. But it is still very difficult to do things like Apple's iLife package in Java. Hmm... imagine a cross-platform iLife clone in Java... The office suites are already doable and done in Java (e.g. ThinkFree) but there is still quite a bit missing.

I am now rewriting applications from Java to C++

I am rewriting some applications from Java to ancient C++. I need to support multiple platforms, and I get more of what I need in a much more stable form from C++ with a handcrafted intermediate cross-platform library and some selected of-the-shelf libraries (STLport, ACE communication framework).

Unfortunately Java is heading in the completely wrong direction for my purpose. And starting with Java 5 I no longer trust Sun to get it right. They simply don't get it. They silently drop extensions (JavaComm). Others are silently put on life support (e.g. the media framework). But what pushed me over to C/C++ was the sudden outbreak of vanity language featuritis in Java 5.

Sun was always bad at maintaining the existing code. They typically prefer to add new junk instead of fixing and finishing existing things. But with Java 5 they stretched it too fare. More bugs than one could shake a stick at and useless vanity features. I put some applications on hold when Java 5 came out, waiting for Java 6. But after seeing Java 6 I decided to move these applications straight from Java 1.4 to C++. I think I waited long enough for a mature Java version.

With Java 6 now out, and still ten year old bugs not fixed, but yet more new gunk added, I have no choice but to revert to trusted and tried technology. In need something predictable to protect my investment in the long term. I am sik and tired of having to play catchup with Sun.

I see the current fanboy discussions regarding Java 7, but I still don't see any sight of an attempt to fix existing things and get them right. Instead of a consolidation more fanboy vanity features than ever. Bah! That is nothing I want to put my money at.

Realy kidding ?

C/C++ better at multiplatform support that Java ? Emmm... I hope this was a joke ;-) About "vanity of Java 5 language improvements", do you realy consider genericity as vanity ? Again, I do hope this was a joke from you. About 10yo bugs not fixed, I think this is also a joke but from Sun, well ... a pretty bad one ;-) But, ey, now that JDK is officially GPL, there will be some serious changes on this area to anticipate ! About discussion on JDK7, I personally do nto see any advantages to closure but to make "function oriented programers" happy to use Java ! I would better see runtime aware genericity implemented so that genericity can benefit the dynamicity ... but this is a very personal choice.

Realy kidding ?

I would better see runtime aware genericity implemented... That's exactly what I've been thinking.

It depends...

On the desktop I'll be using Java 6... if Apple will support it on Tiger. If instead they will support it only on Leopard, I don't know. I don't want to force people to upgrade their o.s. only to run my applications... On the server side I think Java 6 with no problems.

5 and earlier

6 is a disaster, from all I see 7 will be even worse.

Meanwhile I'm reasonably happy with 5, and most of our customers still use 1.4 or 1.3, so that's what I use and will likely continue to use unless an opportunity to move away from Java to a language where the caretakers are less intent on destroying what they're supposed to guard comes along.

5 and earlier

jwenting, you're seriously misinformed.

Java 6 is awesome. There are no new language features in Java 6, so it's use is no different that Java 5. The JVM has speed improvements and refinements. Swing is faster. The Java 6 JRE is also smaller than Java 5 (12.5MB vs 16MB). If you're okay with Java 5, then Java 6 should be fine too. Java 7 may have some new language features that you may not like. But Java 6 -- with no new language features -- there's nothing not to like.

-Bryan

5 and earlier

6.0 IS terrible. Massive collection of junk added. Webservers, database servers, crap like that. All for no other reason than that XXXXX (where XXXXX is someone's hyped language) also has it.

It started a bit in 5.0, but 6.0 is worse, and it seems that 7.0 will be worse still.

5 and earlier

jwenting,

Java 6 JRE does have an extremely small web server built in to support web services. But like I said, the Java 5 JRE is smaller than Java 5. All of the junk has been removed.

The Java database is about 2MB big and it only exists in the JDK not in the JRE. It's no big deal, you make it out to be this massive problem. Sun has found a way to reduce the size of the JRE while supporting new features (notice these are not new language features).

Anyway, I think your main concerns are poorly researched. If you downloaded and took a look at Java 6, you pretty much just find a faster Java 5. Chill out, save your venom for Java 7 (if that has major language changes).

-Bryan

5 and earlier

And if you don't believe that, just look at the proposals for 7.0:

function pointers, operator overloading, XML syntax, embedded XML processor, the list of nonsense goes on and on.

Sun is destroying the platform as rapidly as they can, for whatever reason.

5 and earlier

I hope that none of these language changes take place for 7.0. In my opinion all these extra language features add complexity to the language without enough benefit.

5 and earlier

operator overloading... wtf are you gawking at? that is a much welcomed (and needed) addition

5 and earlier

much welcomed By whom ? If I recall correctly, there was a poll here about operator overloading, and almost 60% were against this feature. Of the remaining 40%, only a fraction wanted to allow it anywhere - the others wanted to restrict its use to some packages, like java.util. I personally think the cons outweigh the pros by a large margin on this one. Haven't we learned anything from the C++ days ? It can hurt readability and maintainability very badly, for a marginal gain in a couple of situations. And before you argue you are a responsible developer and you would only use it where it was profitable : I don't doubt that for a second. But you seldom work from scratch, right ? You use and modify other people's code all the time, don't you ? Operator overloading is more often than not misused - do not underestimate the propensity some people have to use all the bells and whistles a language provides. needed Where ? I'd wager it would have limited usefulness. It could make some maths slightly easier to read, true... and that's about it, I guess. Adding complexity is only an acceptable tradeoff if you get something really useful in return. Some of the new features in Tiger fit the bill, for me at least. Enumerated types ? Sure. Generics ? Close call. Static imports ? Meh... at least it can't do much harm. Operator overloading ? Definitely not worth the added complexity and future maintenance nightmare. Again, we should know better and learn from C++ mistakes. -- As for me, I'll probably be using Java 6.

5 and earlier

apple + pear = orange a welcome addition?

Operator overloading is something that's a major cause of bugs in languages that have it, even more so than is multiple inheritance.

It was omitted from Java for that reason, and now being snuck in through the backdoor for marketing reasons ("C++ has it so we must have it too").

5 and earlier

6.0 IS terrible. Massive collection of junk added. Webservers, database servers, crap like that. All for no other reason than that XXXXX (where XXXXX is someone's hyped language) also has it.

It started a bit in 5.0, but 6.0 is worse, and it seems that 7.0 will be worse still.

5 and earlier

dude, are you read-impaired? Webserver is a tiny class very good for testing. database is part of Sun JDE, not JRE. still download size of Java 6 jre is smaller. still cannot understand?

5 and earlier

6.0 is awesome. Look for a life-cycle change over the next few months as companies build proprietary solutions on top of 5.0 and 6.0. 6.0 has dramatic performance improvements that may entice companies to leap frog over 5.0 to 6.0.

U is Correct?

why people care so much about the new libraries ? IF u dun use them just ignore them.Someone may need thes new libraies, Stack, Quene are long-looking featues for someone. U guys make me think of the day that short_sigh programmer say gc is suck... NOTICE THE JRE of 6.0 is even smaller than 5.0.... Also, 6.0 have no new language changes, dun speak the wrong thing to influence others.