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What are you most interested in doing with the open-source Java SE code?

Contributing code
13% (29 votes)
Porting to other platforms
7% (16 votes)
Investigating possible bugs
11% (25 votes)
Studying how it works
39% (88 votes)
Something else
7% (16 votes)
Not planning on using it directly
23% (52 votes)
Total votes: 226

Comments

The only reason...

The only reasons I want and free as in liberty JDK is to copy parts of the implementation into my own code and perhaps come up with a "next generation" language and runtime. Neither the GPL nor the non-GPL compatible GPL variant go any way at all to helping. This move appear to make it less likely that Java will be released under a less political open source license.

The only reason...

You are free to license the Java source code. You'll not be bound by the GPL.

The only reason...

The only reasons I want and free as in liberty JDK is to copy parts of the implementation into my own code and perhaps come up with a "next generation" language and runtime. Neither the GPL nor the non-GPL compatible GPL variant go any way at all to helping. This move appear to make it less likely that Java will be released under a less political open source license.

The only reason...

Other JVMs or Mono or LLVM or Tamarin or whatever should be fine for your purposes. Well, I'm not sure on the license of these, but surely some would work. And GPL won't kill you either, unless you are allergic to not making proprietary products from Sun's investment. GPL is fine for Sun's needs and most of the Java (and Linux) community.

The only reason...

I would like to be able to use code from Java in my software, in the same way that Java uses small amounts of my code. If "free as in liberty" is claimed, it doesn't seem unreasonable that companies shouldn't have a two-way exchange of code. The ideology of GPL appears to be that it should not be possible to make money out of investing in software creation. GPL use by companies tends to be aimed at turning spent investments into attacks against competitors.

The only reason...

You are free to license the Java source code. You'll not be bound by the GPL... Or are you against Sun being able to "make money out of investing in software creation"?

The only reason...

I was free to license the Java code last week. I am very happy Java has been free as in gratis for 10 years. The recent announcement does not move things forward an inch. I am not suggesting Sun has to make Java free as in liberty, but this is not it.

PS3?

So who's doing the port to the PS3? :)

PS3?

After fixing a few of the Swing bugs that have annoyed me the most, porting to other platforms would be cool. Unfortunately I know only a smattering of C, so I would have to read up on that (as well as hardware and OS concepts), but now I have a great reason to. Also porting JavaME to the Sony PSP and Nintento DS would be really cool

Re: PS3?

Depends. Who's already camped out at Best Buy to get one?

Single application JRE forks

Many applications ship with their own JREs because they have only been tested with a single JRE version. The bundled JRE is only ever used by that application. This will make it legal to trim the bundled JRE down to what is actually used by the application. It will also make it possible to include bug fixes needed by the application.

I believe this was all possible before for those willing to spend the time and money working with Sun. It will now be possible for those without such a budget.

Single application JRE forks

+1 on the trimmed JRE value. Also, just having Java prebundled on Linux distros in the future will be very nice. Hoping it can happen sooner than later (although I understand a lot of work is still left to get there).

so programmers being somewhat geeky...

want to download the source and examine this platform we've all been using... but i can see myself contributing a year+ down the road.

All of that!

That's my missing answer to the poll.

All of that!

Well, more precisely: + Studying how it works + Investigating possible bugs + Contributing code