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Do you use NetBeans?

Yes, as my primary IDE
34% (539 votes)
Yes, as a secondary IDE
17% (268 votes)
No, I use something else
43% (678 votes)
No, I don't use IDE's
5% (83 votes)
Total votes: 1568

Comments

Java.net should be renamed Sun.com

Hani is right ?!!

Java.net should be renamed Sun.com

perhaps you might want to take a look at the poll results before leaving petty comments ;-)

Java.net should be renamed Sun.com

I see that Sun's employees all took the poll... ;-)

Java.net should be renamed Sun.com

lol. I agree. :-)

I’m sure Sun does some strong-arm tactics, as does other players. However, nobody does it better than Microsoft. It’s either Microsoft's way or the highway. Regardless of what IDE you like, it is much better than a $2000 copy of VisualStudio.

netBeans 5

It is great how netBeans has become what it is now, I liked many of its new features like Matisse and that it supports Struts and JSF for the Web front end. But I think it could use some of the convenience provided by eclipse, like the smart code completion and other stuff. I guess if eclipse and netBeans could join forces we would end-up with a killer IDE! although that might not be so easy to accomplish!

netBeans 5

I think it is better, if there are two projects around (and IntelliJ and JDeveloper should also be mentioned). Netbeans has improved a lot and I like most of it. But my firm belief is that Netbeans needed Eclipse to make them improve faster. I also believe that we wouldn't have Eclipse WebToolsProject without Netbeans very good JSP, JSF and Struts-support. And hopefully Matisse makes Eclipse-developers improve upon the VisualEditor. They better do... So IMHO competition is good and motivates developers best.

I expected more from NetBeans 5

Let me state that I'm a strong supported of 100% Java, so I don't like all that native stuff inside Eclipse. But I've been working with Eclipse (both for my job and for opensource projects) for four years and I work pretty good with it. I like the extremely flexible refactoring tools and the embedded code formatter. I've started working with NetBeans 5 a couple of week ago, as I ported one of my smaller opensource projects into it. NetBeans filled most of the gap for what concerns the refactoring tools, but still lacks things such as "Extract to local variable". Either I'm missing something here, or I don't find any code formatter - just an indentation engine. Versioning support is inferior to Eclipse (e.g. the comparison viewer is not able to deal with some complex cases, subversion is supported only as a command-line wrapper and to switch between the CVS plugin and Subversion you must turn things on and off in the plugin manager). I understand that NetBeans should be superior to Eclipse in the J2EE area support and for thins such as the profiler, but I'm puzzled with all these incomplete, missing or cumbersome *basic* features...

Netbeans 5.0

I first would like to congradulate the Netbeans team on a fantastic product. I tried various IDE's from JBuilder to Eclipse and I never enjoyed them. I always feel back to my command line VI roots. Netbeans 4.1+ was the first IDE that was intuitive and I could get up and running quickly. Netbeans 4.1, Sun Java Studio Enterprise 8 and Netbeans 5.0 have been a joy to work with. For the people who say Eclipse > Netbeans, you should see the new profiler in 5.0, it's amazing. A few features I wouldn't mind seeing in the future. 1. Grab the UML modeling from SJTE8 and put it into Netbeans 2. The ability to export your IDE settings, so that I can duplicate my enviornment in a snap (from my work machine, to my notebook to my home)

Netbeans 5.0

Eclipse has export and import of configuration settings for years.

idea is 1000 years ahead

Hey, falks. There is no competition - IDEA is WAY ahead of Eclipse, NetBeans. Just JavaBuilder is probably a little bit closer to it... Friends from Eclipse and Netbeans - it's a long long road is just ahead of you, try catch IDEA if you can...

idea is 1000 years ahead

that is not true... I think : there are areas in IDEA that are far more inconvenience and challenging …. to use than in Netbeans/Eclipse 1) CVS support, so far I have not seen any IDE that supports CVS as good as eclipse, including Netbean’s, so called” renewed” CVS,which is not bad, but still immature, and somehow basic, and IDEA IntelliJ CVS can not stand next to eclipse CVS … eclipse is far ahead on that ... 2) multi project support perspective-veiws, again Eclipse is ahead of Netbeans on that which in turn is Ahead of IDEA .... 3) code completion/ Editors Netbeans and IntelliJ are far ahead of eclipse due to pathetic web Development support in Eclipse . Including, so far hopeless “Eclipse Web Tools Platform Project” ….I would say Netbeans and ItelliJ are standing Strong, even thought I favor Netbeans more due to innovative new features in release 5 3) collaboration - This is great feature in Netbeans, I believe none , Eclipse or IntelliJ support this yet .... Otherwise I have been using netbeans for my webProjects , it has been working for me well so far … but cant make it my primary IDE yet still on Eclipse for that yet .

is one really better than the other?

While being an Eclipse user, I find myself curious about Netbeans for Swing based development. The concept of "One Development IDE to Rule Them All" still hasn't quite been achieved by Eclipse, but I don't doubt ti could be there in the coming years, simply due to strength of community and nearly consolidated industry backing.

Let the holy wars begin: Eclipse vs NetBeans

I know I'm setting myself up to be flamed, but nobody has jumped up and down on me for a while.
Eclipse is the IDE of choice at the company where I work. All of the java development, and there is a lot, is done in Eclipse.
Personally, I've tried over and over to use Eclipse and I always end up going back to NetBeans. NetBeans is easier, faster, more intuitive. Especially with 4.1 and 5.0, NetBeans is better in every way.
I know that use of Eclipse is more wide spread than NetBeans, but I think that is a mistake. Perhaps once-upon-a-time Eclipse was better, but not any more. The simplest task of developing a Java application is simply too involved. The packages have to be created individually. The new project wizard has no option to create a Main class, as far as I've seen, so that's another step you have to go through when creating a new project. Even running the application and then returning to coding requires extra steps.
All right, that's my 2 cents worth. Start lighting matches.

Let the holy wars begin: Eclipse vs NetBeans

I'm trying another flavour of NetBeans (Java Studio Enterprise) as I have a project that targets the Sun Java Enterprise System. I have to say I'm disappointed, as I have been every other time I've tried it. The big problem I see is that whereas for eclipse there is almost always a free or cheap plugin that addresses the weaknesses of the base JDT, on NetBeans you are stuck with pretty much what Sun gives you. Not that Sun doesn't give you a lot, and NetBeans only falls behind because eclipse and idea are stiff competition. I am going to stick it out with Java Studio for this project and see if my opinion changes. But I'm already missing integrated UML, among other things. - Andrew Glynn

Let the holy wars begin: Eclipse vs NetBeans

I don't see this as a war, but good old competition.

The NetBeans experience 1.0-3.0 was crap. I know developers that preferred a Non-IDE to NetBeans. I haven't seen the NetBeans 5.0 on a Mac. Has NetBeans finally adapted the native look and feel on the Mac? (Eclipse is not perfect, but at least Eclipse made an effort toward native look and feel).

Interesting that other IDEs are not in the debate. IntellJ users think both Eclipse and NetBeans are lacking. For $50.00, MyEclipse turns Eclipse into a high-end enterprise application.

Everybody has a different mindset and goals. Great that NetBeans satisfies your needs. However, NetBeans 4.1 still had too many issues for me. I will download the NetBeans 5.0 and kick the tires. :-)

Let the holy wars begin: Eclipse vs NetBeans

Thats the thign with Eclipse, it *is* native. It uses the native widget set encapsulated as SWT components. When you can say to your client "It's not slow because it runs the OS specific widget set instead of its own", that's a powerful thing. Unfortunately Swing still has to shake the impression that it's slow even if its not slow anymore (or hasn't been for a long time).

Let the holy wars begin: Eclipse vs NetBeans

Does Eclipse run at all on IntelMacs yet? Not tat I have or plan to have one... Just know that to get Eclipse working on Solaris 10 x86 one needs to build SWT himself... yuk!

Let the holy wars begin: Eclipse vs NetBeans

I'm working with Netbeans in the past. Then, I changed for Eclipse. Now, the Matisse project is great improvement, but I never change my Eclipse plataform for Netbeans. I think that the WYSIWYG system support of the Netbeans is the unique feature that really make sense. In all others, the Eclipse given a show. Of course, Eclipse without plugins are a simple enhanced ultraedit tool, but many plugins are available. The problem are choosen the correct set of them.

Let the holy wars begin: Eclipse vs NetBeans

JFormDesigner is really more productive for me then Matisee.

Let the holy wars begin: Eclipse vs NetBeans

Completely agree. I love JFormDesigner. Well worth the cost of admission.

Let the holy wars begin: Eclipse vs NetBeans

I cannot bear all complex UI of NetBeans & Eclipse. Frankly saying only IDE/Editor i like is (in context of user-friendliness n UI) jEdit.