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What platform are you most looking forward to using in 2006?

Java EE 5
31% (435 votes)
Java SE 6
52% (733 votes)
Apache Harmony
9% (126 votes)
Something else
8% (106 votes)
Total votes: 1400

Comments

When will Harmony ship?

"...and it counters the fear & loathing around the idea of open source runtimes because if IBM, Intel and Apache are doing it, it can't be as evil, as whatever one's afraid of." I find this an interesting statement as I have much fear and loathing for IBM and Intel.

When will Harmony ship?

I agree. A company that got sued by AMD for using anti competitive means in increase sales in Asia can't be trusted with too many "open" or "benign" efforts. (Robilad leaves me with no option but to get some facts straight and potentially trigger a flame war in he process - my apologies.) And robilad speaks of "...the golden bridge to join the free runtime world". Do you remember paying for a JRE/JDK distribution like that of Sun or BEA? They're still free, but do not fit your convenient definition of "open". That's all there is to it. The open source world has the choice of "demanding" charity in the form of "open" (-free doesn't seem to suffice-) runtimes from the major players or building their own. I'd prefer the latter approach. It's then that you have the right to ask the biggies to open up theirs (I'd love to see IBM do that first).

When will Harmony ship?

No flame wars desired on my side ;) When I speak of free, I speak of free as in speech, not free as in 'gratis proprietary giveaways'. When I speak of 'free runtimes' I speak of runtimes that I am free to use as I wish, modify as I wish, learn from as I wish and redistribute as I wish. That's why I speak of freedom, not price. It is not necessary that anyone begs proprietary software vendors for gifts: the current crop of free runtimes like Kaffe, gcj and other does the job increasingly well, and will continue to do so until there is no longer a pressing a need to have to submit oneself to using proprietary runtimes to use programs and libraries written in the Java programming language. It is up to the proprietary software vendors if they see that as an opportunity to join in the community, and when they join in, and what area of expertise they chose to contribute to. It does not really matter if Sun joins in today, tomorrow, or never, in the long run, just like it didn't really matter if Borland, Watcom Microsoft or other DOS compiler vendors joined into gcc development. As for paying for proprietary software, yes, you pay for Apple's 1.5 Java runtime when you buy their operating system. Just like you pay for Sun's VM when you buy Solaris 10 support from Sun, or like you pay for BEA's VM when you buy BEA's proprietary J2EE product. It's not an explicit item on the bill, but like any other component of their proprietary software offers, it is being paid for by your purchase of the sum of components. As for IBM's contributions to free runtimes, they are doing a pretty good job with JikesRVM.sf.net, for example, which is one of the places where new, exciting JVM research happens. What have you done, exactly, and who are you to troll java.net forums, anyway? ;) cheers, dalibor topic

When will Harmony ship?

That heavily depends on how the ASF evolves internally in the next couple of years. Currently, the ASF is wary of intergating their projects with other projects that are not under the Apache license, and as GNU Classpath is not an ASF project, it is not under the Apache license. That poses regular fodder for thought on the Apache Harmony mailing list. It is, at the core, a political decision for the project: as long as Apache Harmony is marketed as 100% Apache license only, it has an interesting card up its sleeve to attract coporations familar with the Apache License to contribute their code to the Harmony project. That has so far led to contributions from IBM and Intel, so the 'Harmony is like totally not Classpath, dude' strategy is bearing some fruit in getting some formerly closed code drawn into the open. At the core it is a political issue for the ASF wheather it accepts certain licenses as Apache-friendly or not, Until that happens, it will take a while before Apache Harmony ships with any non-Apache licensed component, or even implicitely uses one. That holds for GNU Classpath, just like for any other non-Apache licensed code out there. And that's not a bad thing either, as it provides a different outlet for prorpietary Java vendors to push their code into the open. In addition, it keeps the rumbling, unproductive noise away from GNU Classpath, gcj, Kaffe and other projects until they are ready for the general developing public. cheers, dalibor topic

How about...

RoR ducks

Tools...

The next final versions of Netbeans and Java Studio Creator.

hope I'll be using Java

Company is abandoning Java so I hope I'll still be able to use it in any capacity...

Or find a job where I can keep using it, if push comes to shove.

hope I'll be using Java

Get a new job :)

how about jse 5?

many of us are still looking towards using java 5. just recentrly we were able to allign all our tools around java 5 and we will migrate soon. many tools took a lot of time to support java 5 so there you go.....

how about jse 5?

You seem lucky to me We are still stuck with J2SE 1.3 / J2EE and VERY VERY carefully planning to migrate to J2SE 1.4/ J2EE 1.4 So my reply would be : J2SE 1.4! :-)

When will Harmony ship?

I like the idea of Apache Harmony, but before I worry about it, I need to see evidence that they'll get somewhere. Also, despite other works in progress (Kaffe, SableVM/JDK, GCJ, Mono/IKVM, and Classpath used throughout), I don't know of any simple compatible, open source JDK with a JIT.


Java can be reused in open source situations, but not without some amount of effort bridging gaps. Maybe it will happen someday, though, and it still is possible to use Java on a full open source stack if you are careful. But Harmony hasn't shown any substance yet that I've heard of.

When will Harmony ship?

The roadmap presented at ApacheCon looks to a 1.0 release in 2007, but anticipates pulling a lot of the key pieces together in 2006: a JVM that gets JIT and GC in Q3, and enough of the libraries working to support Eclipse in Q2 and Geronimo in Q4. They anticipate emerging from the incubator by the end of 2006. It should be interesting to watch.

When will Harmony ship?

Hang on; Eclipse works just fine for about 6 months now, as do Jonas and JEdit and various other big tools.