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Earliest J2SE version that your next app must still support:

1.02
2% (15 votes)
1.1
4% (38 votes)
1.2
5% (52 votes)
1.3
20% (191 votes)
1.4
55% (518 votes)
1.5
14% (134 votes)
Total votes: 948

Comments

Results may be slanted a little

The answer to this question will differ depending upon who is answering. If I am a back-bedroom hobbyist programmer then I am very likely to answer 1.4 or 1.5, as I have complete control over my deployment environment - given that it's my own personal computer. If I am a programmer writing bespoke in-house software for my employer, statistically I suspect there'll be an increased chance I'll want to support older versions. I have *some* control over my deployment environment - but perhaps not to the point where I can force everyone in the company to upgrade to a new JRE on my command. If I am a programmer writing software for a wider audience, statistically I would guess there is an even greater chance I would want to support version like 1.3, or earlier. I have absolutely no control over my deployment environment, so if I want the widest audience (and the most revenue) then it is wise to target the earliest JRE I can get away with. To truely understand the figures produced by this poll we need to place them into a context like the one above. Perhaps the poll should be re-run as an array of polls, categorised by the audience the author is targeting...?

Figure two years...

for a typical larger customer to adopt a new version. Some will take less, and many much longer, but two years is probably a pretty good rule of thumb.

1.5?

My company always codes to the latest stable release. Unfortunately, J2SE 1.5 is still a preview technology subject to change. As soon as J2SE 1.5 is stable and my IDE fully supports it, we will move on.

retroweaver

if your company allows this try retroweaver. it allows development (mostly) with 1.5 features but makes deployment possible for 1.4: retroweaver.sf.net

It is even worse with J2EE

J2SE is usually not a problem but I'd still love to be able to use J2SE 1.4/1.5 features. As it stands, we have to provide applications that run on J2EE 1.2 app servers because we have customers (still!) running WebSphere 4. I'd love to be able to use the new features of J2EE 1.3 or even 1.4, as well as the new constructs of J2SE 1.4 (e.g., assert) and 1.5 (generics) but unfortunately I can't. Frustrating because it would save us so much time!

I don't get the question.

The JDK supports my app. NOT the other way around. I write my app to a J2SE rev and then it sits until I upgrade. I've one app that was written to jdk 1.1 and it still runs on 1.4.2_04. e.g. the jdk must support my apps revision, not the other way around.

I wish we could use 1.5

Development of our product started in january. We have a release date set sometime in august. For the lingest time I was hoping we could ship with 1.5, since there are lot of features that we find very useful (especially the class metadata). Unfortunately, we can't. But if the release date had been just a few moths further out, I'd have selected the 1.5 option in this poll. As it stands, we have to use 1.4.

re: I wish we could use 1.5

if your company allows this try retroweaver. it allows you to develop (mostly) with 1.5 and deployment for 1.4: retroweaver.sf.net

re: I wish we could use 1.5

Unfortinately that won't cut it. Once of the major features our 1.5 version uses (will use) are the class metadata. The rest are just syntactic sugar and can easily be retrofitted anyway...

re: I wish we could use 1.5

You could use commons-attributes if you really want to use attributes...

re: I wish we could use 1.5

Hi loke, > Once of the major features our 1.5 version uses (will use) are the class metadata. How are you planning on using Annotations? You can still use them with Retroweaver, and they will still be accessible from your class files - just not using the JDK 1.5 reflection API. > The rest are just syntactic sugar and can easily be retrofitted anyway... I tend to disagree, but I'm a little biased since I wrote Retroweaver. God bless, -Toby Reyelts