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Ed Burns

Community: 

Oracle

Playing Tunnels of Doom on a TI-99/4A computer in 1982 turned Ed Burns into a programmer. By 1995 he'd earned a bachelor's in Computer Science, with a minor in Germanic Studies and emphasis on computer music, through University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC). Through UIUC's co-op program, Ed worked for IBM and the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA). These experiences, plus programming in Objective-C on the NeXT computers in the computer music lab, propelled Ed into the dot-com boom. After a brief stint at Silicon Graphics, he landed at Sun Microsystems, which was acquired by Oracle in 2009.

Ed is currently a Consulting Member of the Technical Staff at Oracle, telecommuting from his home is Altamonte Springs, Florida, where he is married with two sons. He is responsible for leading specifications within the JCP program, serving as co-Spec Lead of the three successive versions of Java ServerFaces (JSF) developed through JSRs 127, 252, and 314. He also served as an Expert for JSRs 154, 245, 273, 276, and 303, influencing a variety of Java SE and Java EE projects. Ed spends a lot of his free time writing up his dual passions -- JSF and professional processes. He co-authored JavaServer Faces: The Complete Reference (2006) and its sequel, JavaServer Faces 2.0, The Complete Reference (2009). He is the sole author of Secrets of the Rock Star Programmers: Riding the IT Crest (2008). You can keep track of Ed through his homepage or his tweets @edburns.

In the same year that the PMO pronounced Ed Star Spec Lead for 2009, the JCP community named him Most Outstanding Java SE/EE Spec Lead for his work on JSR 314. He is in demand as a speaker and has offered keynote addresses for the W-JAX conference in Munich, Germany, Globalcode Developer's Conference in São Paulo, Brazil, and JSFDays conference in Vienna, Austria. In leading JSRs, he practices transparent communication by explaining new features and polling audiences through his blog, social media, online JSF chatroom, conference engagements (JavaOne, JAOO, JAX, W-JAX, No Fluff Just Stuff, GlobalCode Developer's Conference, GeekOut, CON_FESS, The Ajax Experience), and Java and Linux user group meetings. Once a new version of a specification is released, Ed takes care to show how the final product reflects community input. He understands that we can't really call it a Java Community Process unless there is a closed loop between community input and the actual technology in the Java platform.