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Extreme Programming

I'm reflecting on the most important tools I've been using this past year for my Java projects. IntelliJ Idea - A fine IDE. My current default. Eclipse - I've used it some, and found it a little clunkier than IntelliJ's. But I plan to move toward it more this coming year. P4 - Perforce source control system. It's free for a single user, and does a nice job. I've used two primary testing...
on Dec 25, 2003

Community

Check out my Artima blog entry, Deconstructing the Cmabirgde Uinervtisy Rschereach Sramlcbe, wherein the wild meme: Aoccdrnig to a rscheearch at Cmabrigde Uinervtisy, it deosn't mttaer in waht oredr the ltteers in a wrod are, the olny iprmoetnt tihng is taht the frist and lsat ltteer be at the rghit pclae. The rset can be a toatl mses and you can sitll raed it wouthit porbelm. Tihs is bcuseae...
on Dec 24, 2003
I was going to blog about Date and Calendar (and how terrible they are), but these must wait now. Straight to the point: if you want to get J2SDK 1.5.0 alpha, just go to: http://www.javalobby.org/members/j2se15.jsp This is a cooperation between JavaLobby - hey, just became a member 3 weeks ago, after years of Java, can you believe it? - and Sun. This is really a private release, so, you are not...
on Dec 24, 2003
Greg Wilkins, creator of the open-source Jetty servlet engine, spouts off in his blog about why he thinks that Servlets must DIE! Slowly!! It's hard to argue that the servlet specification isn't full of cruft and that the servlet expert group of the JCP should take a major refactoring approach for the 3.0 version of the Servlets specification. However, does Greg's notion of "Contentlets" make...
on Dec 22, 2003
Like Joshua Marinacci How do you develop?, a number of programmers, including myself, have adopted a fairly iterative development style. For the most part, this has been a conscious decision. However, there are times when this isn't always so. Occasionally, the style has more to do with the nature of the work than with the desires of the developer. I was recently preparing for a short...
on Dec 18, 2003
Joel Spolsky, of "Joel on Software" fame has posted a new essay called "Biculturalism", which is a review of the book The Art of Unix Programming by Eric S. Raymond. (If you prefer bits to atoms, you can read the whole book online for free, Eric being a famous Open Source advocate.) [One digression: Follow that link to the book above. You will find yourself on a great website for books: Amazon...
on Dec 16, 2003

Business

I'm not a big fan of the expression "digital convergence", but I do appreciate its results. One of the most important of these results: Cell phones with built in digital cameras (some people refer to them as camera phones, but I prefer cellcams) . I first wrote about cellcams in my first java.net blog entry. In it, I discussed the Nokia 3650, my main device since mid-2003. The 3650 is a...
on Dec 23, 2003
A couple of years ago, I addressed an all-hands meeting for a small division of a Very Big Computer Company I Won't Name. This little division had just over 100 employees. I began with a single question, "How many of you have seen a customer in the last 30 days?" (about two hands went up.) "The last 90 days?" (one additional hand). "The last YEAR?" (couple more hands). So, these folks managed to...
on Dec 22, 2003
Jim Cushing talks about three phases in his Personal Progress blog today: Inquisitive, Complacent, and Emboldened. I often find it more productive to look at the stages of personal progress via the classic growth cycle of childhood, adolescence, adulthood, and senescence. Alas, when I look at things that way, I sometimes get sad since I see that (all too many people and organizations in) our...
on Dec 18, 2003
Microsoft's campaign to take over the world is bringing it into conflict with a few people. I have already amply talked about Microsoft's battles with the Java camp (which are still just in the warm-up stages). That battle brings the software titan into conflict with IBM, Sun, BEA, Oracle, and host of others. Battles in the database arena redouble that conflict with IBM, Oracle,and others....
on Dec 10, 2003
Earlier this week, I blogged about Microsoft phasing out products which depend on Java. Well, the agile marketing arm of Microsoft has flexed its muscles again with... Microsoft Clarifies Intentions to Retire JVM-Based Products. Basically, all they have done is pushed the drop dead date back one measely week and are more precise about which products are getting whacked. Yawn.
on Dec 10, 2003
Now, before I go on, I want to address a very strong prejudice that I've noticed in my dealings with Open Source developers. It's the old familiar sentiment that if it isn't built in Java, it ain't worth using. That might be true for a lot of people, and I have a lot of respect for that sentiment--it's an important one for our community. We're doing more than writing software in a certain...
on Dec 10, 2003

Programming

There ain't no rules around here. We're trying to accomplish something! --Thomas Alvo Edison If you've ever been thrust onto a project already in progress, you've no doubt gone through a few different phases. No, I'm not talking about project phases, such as design, develop, test, etc. I'm talking about the personal phases that you, as an idividual developer, go through. When you're new to...
on Dec 18, 2003

Distributed

Philip Brittan blogs about his various articles dealing with Security Strategies. State is the second worst thing in distributed computing. No state is the worst. --John Ousterhout
on Dec 16, 2003

Open Source

Erik Hatcher writes Velocity: Fast Track to Templating -- a nice and quick introduction to the Apache Group's Velocity Templating engine.
on Dec 16, 2003

Security

The IT security outlook just seems to be getting worse. Maybe it's time to change the rules. We are being bombarded these days about the increasing threat of security. Microsoft has long been a target in this area, as have Java, and Flash, but now Linux is also coming under attack. The attacks are coming with greater frequency and with greater destructive power, and they are coming in the...
on Dec 15, 2003

J2SE

Here are a couple of recent articles with recommendations of Java exception handling practices... From onjava.com, Gunjan Doshi gives us his Best Practices for Exception Handling. From java.net, Jim Cushing gives us hisThree Rules for Effective Exception Handling. The questions of what, where, and why are spot on.
on Dec 12, 2003
One thing I've been missing in Java is support for enums. Some of you might be asking: but what is a enum and why should I care about them? A enum is, in a simple way, a class with a limited domain. For example, a class representing the seasons we have during the year - although climate seems crazy these days, anyway, but that's a different story - is a enum. Another example would be a class that...
on Dec 10, 2003

Databases

The Hibernate project has released version 2.1 of their open-source (LGPL) object/relational persistence system. Hibernate v2.1's claims to fame are Query-by-Criteria, Query-by-Example, and pluggable high-level caching support.
on Dec 12, 2003

Web Services and XML

This is the first of several reflections on what I think I learned here at the XML 2003 conference in Philadelphia. Sorry if it's too XML-geeky and not of sufficient interest to Java people, but I think a lot of what I heard people talking about have considerable relevance beyond the XML community they were aimed at. Jon Udell gave a keynote speech on Tuesday that pierced the jaded, slightly...
on Dec 11, 2003