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Extreme Programming

Example-Driven Development Test-Driven Development is a style that says "write a test for a small bit of functionality, write code to make it pass, refactor, and repeat." In a way, the "test" part of the name is misleading. TDD does produce tests in the sense that they are written to verify whether something works, that an expected answer is defined in advance, and so on. But they're not tests...
on Apr 18, 2004
Like many people, I want a way to run some one-time set up and tear down logic and the approach I usually take is to drop some code into a static initializer block in an abstract test case. For example... public abstract class SomeTestCase extends TestCase {  static {    // perform the "global" set up logic  }} Providing that I remember to subclass...
on Apr 16, 2004
During the chaos of process change, Xp is a lightning rod. Everything wrong is because of Xp and once the dust has settled, everything right is because of Xp. Like most false dichotomies the truth lies some place beyond. People who actually get to "do Xp" often see ways they can apply the four values to other parts of their jobs, and in some cases their lives. That is what I saw while...
on Apr 15, 2004

J2EE

About the author: Satya Kolachina has been in the software industry for 17 years. His programming background begins with C, progresses to C++ and ends up with Java. He likes the UNIX platform and beginning looking for a PC version of it about 10 years ago. He found, and started using, Linux. He told me that – in his opinion - for an open source community with no financial resources to...
on Apr 16, 2004
Entity EJB sends shiver down my spines, I have to admit. Recently, I had to evaluate Entity EJBs (2.0) for a client of mine. I have had used propretiory Entity EJB extensions to implement persistence in enterpise applications, but the standard and portable Entity EJB of today is still dispappointing and no way a serious candidate. The immaturity of EJB-QL alone was enough to convince me that...
on Apr 8, 2004

Business

Computers have undoubtedly and dramatically raised the productivity of businesses world-wide. Yet for all the increased profits that technology can inject into the bottom line, it has a nasty habit of turning around and grabbing fist-fulls of cash back out of the balance sheet (witness Microsoft's massive cash hoard). No one's debating whether or not IT delivers more value than it consumes (...
on Apr 13, 2004
I go to the occassional meeting or trade show where vendors are displaying their wares. I look at what interests me, and sometimes give feedback to the vendors when I have appropriate expertise. Some are interested in my suggestions, some aren't. Not so long ago, I was being given a demo by two guys about their company's leading product. "What features do you have that your competitors don't?"...
on Apr 13, 2004
Today I'm kicking off a new regular feature in my blog. Each month I'll link to items from my java.net and BillDay.com blogs that I think every Java developer, or at least every wireless Java developer, should know from the preceding month's wireless and mobility related news, presentations, and technical information. Diving right in, top wireless stories and resources from March 2004 included...
on Apr 5, 2004
A Book I didn't intend to run a website to make money. Back in late 2000, the dot boom had already turned to dot bust, people were already being layed off left and right, and it was clear that websites, B2B, B2C, ... were no longer the "in thing". If you hadn't raised money for a web venture, then you weren't going to, at least not for a few years when the VC [venture capital] doors might start...
on Apr 1, 2004

Games

In AT's interesting Blog "You Can Make Real Games In Java!!! Yeah... But So What?" he raises a lot of interesting questions. What I don't entirely agree with though are his answers: "Problem is, as far as these guys are concerned, anything we can do in Java, they can do in C++. And they already know how to write games in C++, so proving equivelant (sic) capability is no real argument at all." By...
on Apr 13, 2004
Now that the Game Developer Conference (GDC) is over, and we are slowly getting dug out of being away for a week, it is interesting to look back at the fun things at GDC. There were a number of hot topics at the show. First and foremost was the anticipation of next generation consoles. Many attendees were betting that Xbox 2 would be revealed, but to no avail. Instead a suite of newly...
on Apr 11, 2004
Yeah, there are still those annoying questions about whether or not Java is fast enough. "Yes" we say pointing at 800 3D animated vikings running around on a lush, fully rendered tropical Island, "anything you can do in C++, you can now do in Java" Problem is, as far as these guys are concerned, anything we can do in Java, they can do in C++. And they already know how to write games in C++, so...
on Apr 10, 2004

Community

Frederick P. Brooks, Jr.'s classic, The Mythical Man-Month: Essays on Software Engineering is the first selection for the java.net bookclub. I'm honored to be the moderator for this first bookclub foray and I expect things to get boiling as we attempt to address the tar pits in which we are stuck. I hope that you will join us in examining and discussing the fads, fallacies, dreams, and harsh...
on Apr 13, 2004
Thanks to everyone who contributed to these updates to the java.net governance. The suggested changes went through several rounds of review by our Advisory Board, Fairness Board, and Community leaders and, with their approval, have finally posted to the site. This update provides additional details around existing roles as well as defining some processes. Some noteworthy changes and additions...
on Apr 12, 2004
Michael Tsai has recently finished a Chinese translation of one of my popular O'Reilly articles, "Another Java Servlet Filter Most Web Applications Should Have". If Chinese is your native language and you are a web application programmer, this translation is for you. It may seem kind of odd that I'm writing this blog in English, especially since it would probably be most helpful if it was...
on Apr 10, 2004
Starting today you can find monthly reports for java.net in the java-net project's file sharing section in the Monthly Reports folder. Here are some highlights: Membership has been increasing in an ongoing and steady pace. In March java.net membership grew by 4,794 new members for a total of 41,661. That is one of our best monthly increases so far! Will Iverson and Michael Champion have agreed...
on Apr 1, 2004
The goal of research is to evaluate a new idea and create a body of work that can improve the methods of scientific inquiry, either by simplifying the process or by uncovering new knowledge. When research-driven software exists in the public domain it is serving this very purpose. However, it is too common to download a new algorithm or API and find it sparsely documented in terms of overall...
on Mar 31, 2004

Performance

It has almost been eight months since Sun first talked about Fast Web Services (FWS) (find out more about FWS here). Today our group attended an interesting TOI meeting on FWS delivered by Sun's FWS team. It was very nice of FWS to come and talk to us. Your effort is well appreciated, guys! Anyway, here are some of the highlights from this TOI session - There is a different set of issues...
on Apr 7, 2004

Linux

If the settlement had come yesterday, would anyone have believed it? Sun and Microsoft settled their century long trial with a somewhat largish payment of $1.6b changing hands as part of the deal. The money is a handy thing, I'd imagine, but the funny thing was that both parties said they would collaborate on technology, etc, etc.... Collaborate? Do you guys think this is legit, or is it post-...
on Apr 2, 2004

Patterns

A reference to this article by Clay Shirky was posted to a Patterns mailing list I belong to. I found the new perspective on software engineering so fascinating that I thought others would be interested as well. Mr. Shirky describes his experiences while teaching at NYU and the approaches his students took when creating software for very specific, well-known social groups. He's basically...
on Mar 31, 2004