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Community

Pardon me for blogging this, but I feel the need to rant a bit about the SCO/Linux flap... In Tenessee William's A Streetcar Named Desire there is a memorable character named Blanche DuBois who utters the famous line: "I have always depended on the kindness of strangers..." Where would the Java community be if it weren't for "the kindness of strangers"? I cannot even begin to count those...
on Nov 19, 2003
Greg Wilkins, creator of Jetty and co-founder of the Core Developers Network wrote this in-depth critique of the Java Servlet Specification v2.4.
on Nov 18, 2003
Hilarious!!! ;-) After JavaOne 2003, I brought the Duke trophy (Duke’s Choice Award for Massive Scale) to Brazil and I had a very nice surprise when I was returning to my office and saw a strange scene in the corner: a whole family of Dukes waiting to cross the street to visit their cousin. Immediately I got my camera enabled mobile phone and took a shoot. See the picture… In fact, the...
on Nov 18, 2003
Committees never have vision. They have meetings—John C. Welch Perfection is achieved, not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.—Antoine de Saint-Exupéry Sun might decide to join the Eclipse party after all. The IBM-lead project has been a bit of a thorn in Sun's side. Part of the controversy is the name itself, which Sun...
on Nov 11, 2003
package nature.law.society.human;/** * Obviously, the more complex this class becomes, * the less efficient it becomes, so I intentionally * left it simple, but you can feel free to extend it if * you wish.  Be creative! * * @author N. Alex Rupp */public class Government extends Monopoly {    public Justice dispenseRetributiveJustice(      ...
on Nov 6, 2003
There were about 700 really smart people at the conference. Every talk I went to was chock full of great content. One of my favorite things in the world is to learn something new and man has this been a feeding frenzy. I had many great conversations with the people I've meet ranging from Lego Mindstorms to process and methodology. Here I'll try to sum up what I saw and I learned. I have detailed...
on Nov 2, 2003
I just got back from a weekend of speaking in Atlanta, GA at the No Fluff Just Stuff conference. I've missed the last few because of my work schedule, but it was good to be back and to get a chance to talk with lots of the attendees about cool things they are working on. It was also good to get caught up with the various speakers (we seem to be on the road a lot together) and chat about what we'...
on Oct 27, 2003
The Java Community Process's stated goal is to produce "high quality specifications in 'Internet time' using an inclusive consensus building approach...Consensus around the form and content of the draft is ... built using an iterative review process that allows an ever-widening audience to review and comment on the document" (JSR-215, 2003). In my own experience and that of several others, the...
on Oct 26, 2003
A couple of weeks ago, I went to Abaporu, one of the technical conferences organized by Soujava (a Top 25 Jug) in Brazil. During the keynote, my friend Manoel Lemos was invited to talk about the the National Health Card Project, which has won the Duke's Choice Award in the Massive Scale category, during the last Java One. So, when he was called onstage, he brought the Dukie in one hand and a...
on Oct 23, 2003
Back in May we finally got around having a London based Java meetup where a small handful of techies turned up to a pub and chatted about Java. Month by month, numbers gradually increased and all was looking good until the Java Meetup website started charging a fee for some of their services. Thankfully, Jez came up with the London Java Meetup blog. If you've been following the blog, you'll...
on Oct 21, 2003
Hi, I saw your blog on java.net and thought I'd ask a couple of questions.... Do you think all Java/J2EE developers should be blogging, or just those that are senior, or in consultant roles? Should blog-reading be for general education/feel of the "community", or do you think blogs are only useful when searching for answers to specific problems? If everyone should blog, where do I go to get...
on Oct 14, 2003
I spend most of my time as a Java developer happily writing code without explicitly thinking about encapsulation, polymorphism, and inheritance as underlying principles. I mean those things are given. It would be like noticing wheels are round each time I get in my car. Just like I exploit the roundness of my tires as I tool down the street, I make use of the object-oriented features of Java...
on Sep 24, 2003
Lately you hear many software engineers complaining about competition in the software industry from foreign workers or foreign companies starting to compete. Finally, it seems, that the US is not an island anymore and that we are facing major competition. For me, I cannot comprehend the outcry maybe because I had to fight, learn, change and risk a secure lifestyle to become what I am now. That...
on Sep 18, 2003
I wanted to start my weblog at Java.net a little bit differently but as a former H1-B visa holder Sue’s Spielman weblog with the title “Outsourcing in my company? I do not think so.” stroke a cord and I had to respond. The most replies turn around these sentences: I am a true believe that the legislation currently being proposed to lower the H-1B and L-1B visa quotas will not go far enough. I...
on Sep 12, 2003
The JCP is were we define the Java standards. It is an important process to guarantee at the same time that the technology evolves fast enough to keep it competitive, and also that it maintains the expected compatibility. To make this happen, the process has to reflect the needs and expectations of the full Java Community, not only the point of view of a few vendors. But the JCP may be not what...
on Sep 10, 2003
Last week I spent a much needed vacation in The Outer Banks. If you ever see a sticker with OBX in a circle on it, that's the Outer Banks. Beautiful and isolated barrier islands off of the coast of North Carolina, they provide great rest and relaxation. And also the opportunity to think about how technology fits in our lives. I've got lots of new ideas to discuss in my coming entries, but one in...
on Sep 9, 2003
You may not be able to socialize me (just ask my inlaws or come on my next extended family vacation), but at least socialize my development tools. Social software is slow to make it's way into development tools. Why is this important? Consider the Java platform. The strength and value of the Java platform is directly derived from collaboration among a community. I would argue that the amount...
on Sep 8, 2003
Today we kicked off this year's Sun Tech Days developer conferences in Seattle. I plan to write up a more substantial conference report when I get the chance, but wanted to at least share the presentation bits themselves while we're in progress, so that everyone can check them out. I'd love any and all feedback, especially on my three presentations, of course. :-) And if you're in the area,...
on Sep 4, 2003
The Java Community Process (or JCP) is the main responsible for Java being open and "democratic". Everything that is incorporated to the Java platform - from specific APIs to full J2SE versions - is created through Java Specification Requests (or JSRs), and everyone can propose a new JSR or participate in existing ones. The current version of JCP is 2.5, but a new version (2.6) is being forged...
on Sep 2, 2003
Twenty-five hundred years ago Aristotle came up with an explanation for the common observations that rocks fall and smoke rises. His idea was simple and elegant. His formulation was clever, and his arguments were convincing. He was dead wrong. Aristotle's idea was that there were five elements: Earth, Water, Air, Fire, and Aether in that order. These four elements formed five spherical...
on Sep 2, 2003