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Web Applications

The Mojarra team are proud to announce the release of our Beta version of Mojarra 2.0, implementing the PFD version of the JavaServer Faces 2.0 spec. You can find it on our downloads page, as well as in the GlassFish Update Center. And as always, be sure to check the release notes for more information.
on May 26, 2009
Somewhat recently, I had a user of JSF 2.0 ask how to do a redirect from a JSF 2.0 Ajax request. Here's one way, that I've lifted from one of our tests: First, the bean that does the work: <pre>@ManagedBean@RequestScopedpublic class RedirectBean {&nbsp; &nbsp; public String redirect() {&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; FacesContext ctx = FacesContext.getCurrentInstance...
on May 14, 2009
Just wanted to let everyone know that there's a new article by the esteemed David Geary on JSF 2. Just wanted everyone to know about it - it's the first of the series, and it's really, really good.
on May 13, 2009
After my last blog post on composite components, Ed Burns, the spec lead, pointed out a better way to do things, by using a controller for the component. Let's go over a simple example of how that would work. The example won't actually do anything (unlike most of my examples, which at least pretend to perform a function) - I just want to sketch out a single, simple concept, and show it in code...
on Jan 31, 2009
With the recent release of JSF 2.0 PR, along with the corresponding release of the implementation in Project Mojarra (available also at the GlassFish v3 Prelude Update Center), I thought it might be worthwhile to quickly review the posts I've recently made on new JSF 2.0 features. I've also taken the opportunity to update the posts I've made to reflect the changes that were made between the EDR2...
on Jan 19, 2009
In my previous two technical posts, I described a "switchlist", then added Ajax behavior using the f:ajax tag. If you haven't already, please go back and check on those posts to catch up to where we are. Today, we'll take that basic Switchlist (not the Ajaxified one), and turn it into a component that you can drop into your page with a single tag. We'll Ajaxify the Switchlist compoenent once...
on Dec 14, 2008
In my previous post, I described a "switchlist" set of components and behavior. If you haven't already, please go ahead and read that post, to get the context for this one. This time, we'll wire it up so that it uses Ajax to communicate back to the server. It's going to be a short post - because we're going to use a new feature of JSF 2.0 - the f:ajax tag. Here it is in action: <pre>...
on Dec 3, 2008
You've seen this component before: two lists, with buttons that let you move options from one list to the other. Here's what it looks like: Now, we'll be looking at this for the next few blog posting, so I'm going to ask you to bear with me - this blog will just introduce the context for this component - I won't be showing any neat new JSF 2.0 features - that will happen over the next few...
on Nov 30, 2008
I was sitting in at a talk on Ajax components the other day, and they mentioned the Flickr style editable text. For those who've never experienced the Ajax joy that is Flickr, it's a web based photography site. When viewing your own pictures, text such as the titles of your photos appears just as plain text, just as it does for other people's photos. The difference is that when you hover the...
on Nov 23, 2008
In my previous blog postings, I talked about making the Spinner component, and then added styles via an external css file. Please review those first, if you haven't looked at them yet. This time, we'll move the JavaScript out to a separate file, and make sure that we can execute multiple spinners in a page, like this: <pre>          ...
on Nov 13, 2008
In my last blog, I wrote a simple spinner component. In this posting, I'll add styling to it using the outputStylesheet tag, and a separate css file. The <h:outputStylesheet/> tag is a way to output a cached stylesheet instance to a JSF page - just use it with a "name" attribute, where the name is the name of a css file in the resources directory of your web app. Since this is the same...
on Nov 9, 2008
In a previous posting, I described the basic structure of a JSF 2.0 composite component. Here's a slightly more complex example of writing a component using JSF 2.0's Composite Component feature. The Spinner component takes only 30 lines to create the classic "entry field with buttons" spinner as a component you can use in any JSF page. First a description of what a "Spinner" is, in case you'...
on Nov 8, 2008
In my previous blog post, I talked about the New Composite Component feature of JSF. I'll come back to that shortly, but I'd like to talk about another new feature: integrated Ajax support. While this part of the specification is still being finalized, I thought it might be worthwhile to see what a simple example of the Ajax support in JSF 2.0 will look like. (Don't worry, I'll tie this...
on Nov 4, 2008
One of the pain points for JSF has always been the complexity that you face in creating components. In JSF 2.0, creating a new component that's made up of existing components is a snap. Here's a quick example of how you can create a new component, and use it in your page. For this example, I wanted to create a simple text box that has a yellow background. Useful? No. Simple? Yes :-) In...
on Nov 1, 2008
Here's the Comet TicTacToe that I went over in my BOF on Comet on Wednesday night. It's pretty simple (though not as simple as my first example, or even the somewhat improved version) - just 200 lines of Java code (including the game logic), 50 lines of JavaScript (embedded in an HTML page), 50 lines of HTML, and a 75 line CSS file. Simple stuff, but if you're looking to write your own Comet...
on May 7, 2008
In my previous blog, I mentioned that I didn't like the hack of reloading the iframe via the post action - it's hacky, and it's not hard to imagine it messing things up in a more complex program. Turns out the answer is both easy and blindingly obvious once you think of it: the iframe onload event. And while we're add it, we'll add a onerror event too. In my previous program, I had had a...
on May 5, 2008
I was looking at a recent blog by Shing Wai Chan and going through the Comet example, when I noticed that the example wasn't working correctly. Although he updated his example to get around that problem, I was still a bit unsatisfied, and decided to sit down, using his basic example, and see if I could make it even simpler. I've whittled it down to about 100 lines, and only 2 files, and I...
on May 1, 2008
I'm currently learning JSF, and wanted to give a little Google link love to a really great guide to learning JSF's use with databases, especially the datatable component. The JSF Database Howto written by BalusC is a great getting started guide to using datatables with JSF, and if this is something you're looking for, check it out... It's quite literally better than any of the books on JSF that I...
on Mar 12, 2008