Skip to main content
View by: Most Recent | Topic | Community | Webloggers   
Monthly Archives:    

Blogs by topic: J2SE

• Accessibility • Ajax • Blogging • Business • Community 
• Databases • Deployment • Distributed • Eclipse • Education 
• EJB • Extreme Programming • Games • GlassFish • Grid 
• GUI • IDE • Instant Messaging • J2EE • J2ME 
• J2SE • Jakarta • JavaFX • JavaOne • Jini 
• JSP • JSR • JXTA • LDAP • Linux 
• Mobility • NetBeans • Open Source • OpenSolaris • OSGi 
• P2P • Patterns • Performance • Porting • Programming 
• Research • RMI • RSS Feeds • Search • Security 
• Servlets • Struts • Swing • Testing • Tools 
• Virtual Machine • Web Applications • Web Design • Web Development Tools • Web Services and XML 


J2SE

OK, I admit it. I'm a bit of a trend-happy person, at least in the computer world. When all the buzz around Mac OS X took off last year, I got pretty excited and jumped in full-steam. It helped that I was editing the first Java and Mac OS X title for O'Reilly (Mac OS X for Java Geeks), and so I took off for bluer... er... grayer... skies. This was all pretty good; however, for the record, I was...
on Oct 15, 2003
I got a lot of questions about JNI after my Mac OS X for Java Geeks book was published. I just wrote an article for ONJava, Mac OS X JNI Revisited. While writing the article, I was mostly focused on answering reader questions, but as I was working, I started to wonder why JNI development was just so hard. When I was working at Apple, there was some interesting work done on native integration...
on Oct 9, 2003
I was putting TrackBack support into Pebble the other day and the found that the technical details of a TrackBack involve sending a HTTP POST request to the remote server. I've implemented HTTP POSTs before using the classes in the java.net package, but rather than write all this code again, I thought that I'd take a look at Jakarta Commons HttpClient. What can I say ... this is another top...
on Oct 6, 2003
I read Bill Venner's interview with James Gosling, "Failure and Exceptions," and with Anders Hejlsberg, "The Trouble with Checked Exceptions," and was a little surprised. I thought exceptions would be in .Net since .Net has taken so many other features from Java. I've never found checked exception clauses to be much of a burden. It's one of my favorite features of Java. Anyway, given all the...
on Oct 6, 2003
I received an email today asking about my use of the glass pane. It seems this fellow wants to handle right clicks on any component in each screen. A logical request. In most cases your right clicks are not limited to a single component, yet to receive the events required to show popups you have to add a listener to each component! Not enjoyable. To get around this we can use a glass pane....
on Oct 3, 2003
Don't I have anything good to say about anything? Well, yes I do. I have learned to love Python. Which means I should not be a stickler for strong typing, and therefore autoboxing should be right up my alley. Let me tell you about something that always drives me crazy. I read articles about how to optimize Java code. One warning often heard is that creating a lot of objects has a high...
on Sep 11, 2003
One of the only websites that I can access from the client site that I'm on is the IBM site, and I must admit that it's not on my list of Java related sites that I regularly visit. So, scanning through some of the forums I came across this thread about the overhead of performing object casting in Java. Interesting, and something that I've never really thought about before. I can certainly see...
on Sep 9, 2003
While crusing through the AWT/Swing documentation for another project I ran across a method I never knew existed: Toolkit.setLockingKeyState(int keyCode, boolean on). It's been there since 1.3 (which is what, 3 years old now) but I never noticed it before. Hmm, I thought. What could I use that for. Well, lately I've been doing database apps that sometimes have long access times, so why not create...
on Aug 28, 2003
While working on another project I came up with a silly idea. How could I force windows to remain completely on screen and to snap to the screen edges? A simple form of window snapping. Since you can receive an event every time the window is moved it's easy to create a Component Listener to do it. import java.awt.*;import java.awt.event.*;public class WindowSnapper extends ComponentAdapter {...
on Aug 22, 2003
Have you noticed that I do a lot of complaining? Today I am wondering why Java has no direct support for alpha levels on windows or non-rectangular shapes. Every windowing system in the world seems to support this. Sun has done a good job moving toward support of multiple monitors, unusable screen real estate, and so forth. Why not this feature that would allow Java apps to be a little more...
on Aug 12, 2003
There's been some interesting activity in the Bunkhouse Porch recently. Douglas Dunn has just released the 2nd volume of his Mastering The Fundamentals of the Java Programming Language ... for free! His first book, Java Rules was rated very highly and apparently this is even better. I said the same thing yesterday about Mac OS X for Java Geeks - this is not your normal Java book. Instead,...
on Aug 8, 2003
I've just reviewed this book for the JavaRanch Bunkhouse and thought that I would share it via my blog... I’ve had a PowerBook for about three months now and I thought that I had Java on Mac OS X figured out. How wrong could I be! First of all, it’s worth pointing out that Mac OS X for Java Geeks by Will Iverson is not your normal Java book. It doesn’t teach you how to use Java, and it doesn’t...
on Aug 7, 2003
Is there anything in the world Sun does not consider a "core" API? Just like everyone else in this Brave New World of broadband Internet and gigabyte hard drives, they figure nobody will mind downloading 14 Meg. Of course, they seem to be doing a fantastic job of compressing the JRE compared to the SDK as a whole (the whole 1.4.2 SDK is 44 MB, but expands to just a little over twice the size...
on Aug 7, 2003
I'm currently reading (and reviewing for JavaRanch) Mac OS X for Java Geeks by Will Iverson and I'm surprised at how good the integration between the core Java platform and Mac OS X really is. Okay, I knew that Apple ships JDK 1.3 and 1.4 along with OSX, but I never realised that you could build a Java application and package it up to look like a regular native app wihout running your code...
on Aug 5, 2003
Years ago, I worked at CNN Headline News as a Writer / Associate Producer, which pretty much meant I was an editor, except they paid me the Writer/AP salary (the editors, in turn, were really producers, etc., up and down the corporate ladder). At the time, the de facto standard for newsroom computer systems was "Basys", which wired dumb terminals to a mainframe, and let users view directories,...
on Aug 1, 2003
Anecdotal evidence has been brewing for a while that the Java 3D API has been in a state of decay. Today's events seem to resolve the situation, with a much more promising future for 3D graphics in java than when we woke up this morning, even if that future doesn't seem to include Java3D itself. Much speculation about Java3D has come from developers on Mac OS X, which has never enjoyed a...
on Jul 28, 2003
Return with me, if you will, to the early days of Java. It was hot. People started using it when it was alpha; by beta, there was at least one book out, Netscape supported it, and people were already using it on their web sites. Clearly, the great attraction of Java at the time was the ability to make your web pages actually do something. But Java had other attractions as a language. For me...
on Jul 21, 2003
The idea of the MacHack conference - 48 hours of talking and coding, with an emphasis on doing clever but useless things with code - seems like it would cater exclusively to platform-specific Mac coders. But instead, Java has been a big part of this conference. Ken Arnold's delightful keynote started with principles of good design, both of end-user applications and of API's offered to other...
on Jun 21, 2003
Jonathan Simon's weblog on the Sound API struck a nerve. I recently needed to use the javax.comm API to do serial communications with a ham radio. It's great stuff--it's easy to use, and I was writing code to control the radio within an hour or so. But it also looked like the API hadn't been touched since JDK 1.1.7 or thereabouts. There was no Linux port, no OS X port (yeah, I know, OS X...
on Jun 17, 2003
As many o fyou know, I have been working with music and audio programming in Java for quite some time. This included work with Java sound. After my JavaSound talk this year at JavaOne, I got to grab a bite to eat with my fellow presenters Phil Burk and Nick Didkovsky and JavaSound lead Florian Bomers. I've worked with Florian in the past, most;y communicating via the JavaSound listserv. Now, I...
on Jun 16, 2003