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J2SE

Apple just announced a release date for Mac OS 10.4 Tiger. Surfing around the site I encountered this page linked from the technical specifications page which seems to indicate that it will ship with J2SE 1.4.2 rather than J2SE 5.0 as expected. I really hope this is an out of date page that got missed when the site was updated.
on Apr 12, 2005
After looking back 10 years in Java's history, this month I look forward to see what plans Sun has made. Even though Open Source Java may not be on the cards I do have one recommendation that is due its time. Find out more at JDJ
on Apr 11, 2005
Over the last year the term POJO has enjoyed an enormous success in the Java community. One of the major reasons for this being, of course, introduction of annotations in JDK 5.0. The new version of EJB shows us the promised land where no home or remote interface step, JAXB 2.0 works exclusively with annotations, and there is even a whole JSR that aims to standardize common annotations in Java....
on Apr 2, 2005
During a panel discussion at the 1999 JavaOne conference Bill Joy, talking about the things he didn't like about Java, stated that he "didn't want char to be [a] numerical type". He was outvoted on this one, and as we know the Java char was blessed as a 16-bit numeric primitive type. I don't know whether Joy objected to it being in the numeric type hierarchy (so any char can be cast to an int...
on Mar 22, 2005
If your code or code you use relies on loading fonts by name, you may face severe limitations when trying to use your application in a different environment than the one you performed your tests. Although many of us are aware of the fact specific fonts may not be installed on a machine, trying to work around this problem may prove to be more difficult as it seems at first. Most code that loads...
on Mar 21, 2005
This months JDJ features two articles discussing the history of Java. One written by the very first Java Product Manager, Kim Polese From Here to Ubiquity. The second is my fly on the wall observations from my Sun days Ten Years of Java Technology. I transferred to Javasoft in 1996 from another Sun division, it was a true startup atmosphere compared to the rest of Sun. We only had one director...
on Mar 11, 2005
JSR 270, the umbrella JSR for J2SE 6.0 ("Mustang"), was resoundingly approved by the JCP Executive Committee for J2SE/J2EE earlier this week. The expert group already has some initial members; we'll be accepting additional applications through Monday, 14 March. We won't be able to accept every application, of course, since we'll need to strike a balance between having broad representation from...
on Mar 2, 2005
JLogic, is a digital circuit simulator with an object-oriented design and written in Java. The project has graduated in the Global Education and Learning Community (GELC) at Java.net. JLogic has also released its verst version. I had a few questions for the project owner,Alex Lam S.L. about himself and the future of JLogic: An interview with ,Alex Lam S.L., owner of JLogic Tell us about...
on Feb 28, 2005
There was no fanfare, in fact it's not even linked to from the JDK 1.5 documentation, but the third edition of the Java Language Specification is available for "maintenance review". I only found it because I wondered if a new version of the JLS had been produced for 1.5, and went out looking for it. The changes are only "proposed" changes - it is odd that they didn't go final with the release of...
on Feb 28, 2005
Welcome to the Lab Welcome to the Lab Walk this way. Welcome to the JDK lab. Here we've set up an environment in which people can safely do research under the Java Research License. There's a light (over at the Frankenstein place) by Richard O'Brien Riff Raff: Let the sun and light come streaming Into my life. Into my...
on Feb 18, 2005
I just got bitten by the collections framework. I always thought that the Collections.unmodifiableX() methods returned an unmodifiable copy of the supplied collection, like a shallow copy. This is useful for getter methods where you want to return a copy of a collection to a client class so they can't directly alter the contents of that collection. This enforces encapsulation and ensures that...
on Feb 17, 2005
Almost a year since its last revision, The Java Tutorial has been updated again. Most of the changes are in the basic trails — the ones all new programmers might need. But even if you're not a beginner (actually, especially if you're not) the Tutorial team would like your feedback on the new stuff. The history page says what's changed. Most of the differences aren't terribly noticeable...
on Feb 17, 2005
While sweeping up sawdust before the latest release of JDigraph, I used -Xlint to spot remaining places where I have some things to clean up. I have just a handful to go. I'm having the most trouble with creating Arrays in collection-like classes. JDigraph is a generic efficient directed graph representation, so these arrays are everywhere. I've taken examples from FibHeap.java.   ...
on Jan 7, 2005
A few days ago, I needed to write a program that was essentially a variant of the well-known UNIX diff. I had to find out which lines had been added and deted between two versions of a file--the trick (which made diff inapplicable) was that the order of the lines had been changed. Well, I'd been wanting an excuse to learn Ruby for some time, but the more I thought about it--I could write this...
on Jan 3, 2005
It's time to welcome new projects into the community. They need help and volunteers to get things going. Please email there owners and ask how you can help. Here are the links and descriptions to the latest additions to the Global Education and Learning Community (GELC). Please look through the summaries (from their project page). If you find something interesting, join their projects and help...
on Dec 29, 2004
We've published 5 Mustang builds so far. But there hasn't been much to write home about. We've made some steady progress, but no sweeping language changes, no major new library packages, no ports of the virtual machine to new platforms. We haven't even implemented all of the suggestions from this forum. What's taking us so long? It's probably worth giving...
on Dec 17, 2004
This will be my last JDBC blog on Java.net. I am moving to a new position on the East Coast to head up Technology Evangalism for XQuery for Progress Software (PRGS). I am happy to report that JDBC 4.0 is excellent shape and it will be guided towards it's Early Draft Review and future JCP milestones by Lance Andersen and others in Sun. I'd like to thank everyone who has taken the trouble to read...
on Dec 17, 2004
We've just released the complete J2SE compatibility test sources under a read-only license, so that the community can see what's really going on with Java compatibility testing. See:    http://jck.dev.java.net Background The core strength of the Java platform is compatibility. There can be all kinds of implementations from all kinds of vendors, but they all have to be compatible....
on Dec 13, 2004
What a facinating topic we've had pop up in the discussion between Brett and Kathy. I must admit, like Brett, I've felt a continuing drain on Java's "coolness" over the last few years and Kathy does a wonderful job of saying WHY cool is important. I'd add that keeping Java "cool" is vitally important because often this tends to dictate where creative efforts go. Taking an example outside of...
on Dec 10, 2004
You've got your mustang source snapshot, and have hopefully built your own test JDK. But how can you navigate through the source code? Some things are intuitive, others are the result of years of source changes, integrations and build environment updates. Perhaps the most complex area to understand is the hotspot source tree, or what we refer to as the hotspot workspace. The hotspot source...
on Dec 9, 2004