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J2EE

I have worked on quite a few enterprise systems built on the J2EE platform in the past few years (some in which I was actively involved in the design and some I worked on other people's design). I have always felt there was something not quite right in almost all of those systems. No matter however hard we tried, we ended up with systems that were not seamlessly object oriented across the various...
on Jul 20, 2004
Everything I need to know about EJB I learned from watching Bugs Bunny. In keeping with recent developments in the Java article-writing space, here's my take on a folksy, hyper-extended, EJB-tweaking metaphor (thanks to Bruce Tate and his People of the Elephant for the inspiration; I hope the rumors of a major movie deal all turn out to be true). When I was a kid, the local network affiliate...
on Jul 19, 2004
I'd like to preface this entry with a brief comment: do NOT schedule your out-of-state move the same week as JavaOne. More on that in a moment. I managed to hit (and tremendously enjoy) the first few days of JavaOne this year. Here were the key walk-aways for me: 1. JSF is clearly the future for Java-based web UI development. The model is much richer and coherent that most of the other frameworks...
on Jul 7, 2004
Today, I hopped onto my mountain bike and had a great ride. Even though it was hot, the play of the trail over the hills was beautiful to behold. It had just enough down to let me recharge my legs for the next technical climb. It had sections that stretched me technically and scared me just enough, and sections that let me turn my brain off and just cruise. I got to thinking that it was all...
on Jul 7, 2004
I love San Francisco. The cable cars, the wharf, the hills, the people. And oh, yes, the food. In truth, JavaOne has never been my favorite conference. I’m more of a chicken man than an elephant man, if you know what I mean. But you do have to love San Francisco and the food. So I was looking for a restaurant with Michael Loukides (who edited my book but we’d never met personally),...
on Jul 5, 2004
More fun today with JSF, including some discussion of integration with the new POJO persistence systems, and some musings on web services. JSF & JDO I’ve had a chance to play around a bit with Creator, and it looks like plain old Java objects (or POJO) will play nicely. One nice thing about JSF – it knows about collections, which means that Creator can work with them easily as well...
on Jun 29, 2004
From the very beginning, the JDO specification has been surrounded by controversy. You want drama? Consider the new startup specification against the establishment of relational database vendors and TopLink, the leading OR mapper. You want strangeness? Consider a specification for transparent persistence without any object relational mapping at all. You want a full-out bare-knuckled brawl?...
on Jun 29, 2004
According to Kirk Pepperdine, Gartner does not include open source application servers in their surveys. Two interesting comments from Kirk's article: The next question is, how does open source get reported? By definition, open source draws no licensing revenues and by definition carries a 0% market share. Is it just me or am I right in saying that it just feels wrong to be basing an important...
on Jun 10, 2004
Logging with Log4J is simple and seems to be trivial and doesn't warrant a blog. However Logging in enterprise projects raises interesting requirements and possibilities. The first question is where do you put your Logging library. With JDK Logging, you pretty much have no choice. It is always located in the classpath and loaded by bootstrap classloader, the mother of all class loaders. Log4J...
on Jun 2, 2004
A couple years ago I tried my hand at self publishing books. Specifically, I created my own publishing company, Titan-Books Inc., and published three companion workbooks to my O'Reilly EJB book. The authors and editor did a wonderful job and the books turned out great. However, I quickly discovered that (a) it was lot of work running even a small publishing company and (b) I wasn't making much...
on May 31, 2004
Imagine you entered a retail outlet to shop that just says “OPEN”. Now what is your reaction if something suddenly throws you out of the shop – No reasons given. And then you find the retail outlet with a sign “CLOSED”. You will be frustrated won’t you? You'd expect that the outlet lets you shop now that you have entered it before the "CLOSED" sign is put up. right...
on May 13, 2004
I have had time to re-read the joint IBM and BEA whitepaper on BPELJ. My initial reaction was "Yuck". Intermingling Java snippets with XML invoked a gag reflex, and it was hard for me to keep reading. I missed the relationship between JSR 207 and BPELJ. I cannot include examples from the whitepaper in this blog, the copyright explicitly states that no part of the document may be reproduced...
on May 13, 2004
About the author: Satya Kolachina has been in the software industry for 17 years. His programming background begins with C, progresses to C++ and ends up with Java. He likes the UNIX platform and beginning looking for a PC version of it about 10 years ago. He found, and started using, Linux. He told me that – in his opinion - for an open source community with no financial resources to...
on Apr 16, 2004
Entity EJB sends shiver down my spines, I have to admit. Recently, I had to evaluate Entity EJBs (2.0) for a client of mine. I have had used propretiory Entity EJB extensions to implement persistence in enterpise applications, but the standard and portable Entity EJB of today is still dispappointing and no way a serious candidate. The immaturity of EJB-QL alone was enough to convince me that...
on Apr 8, 2004
The JCP committee approved the final specification for JSR 127. In other words, the long awaited JSF (JavaServer Faces) has finally left its specification stage. There is a lot of expectation about JSF and the problems it will solve (or create). Some people are excited with the technology, others are worried it would compete with frameworks like Struts, while other are just skeptical if its...
on Mar 3, 2004
Since over a year I am thinking about the next generation Application Server that takes the route of JBoss as an flexible J2EE based server and just go through with it and make everything generic. In this server everything is deployable like Containers, Services (as of Transaction, Security, Persistence, Pooling etc) and Applications. The application server specification is replaced by a...
on Feb 25, 2004
Back in September Allen Holub said that accessors are evil, there was also a long thread on TSS about Allen's article. Then very recently Cedric Beust posted that he thought accessors are here to stay and that Allen Holub was all wrong (I tend to agree with Cedric on accessors but Allen did make a couple of good points). Which all seem to have very little to do with JSF I know but... Consider...
on Feb 14, 2004
Java Developer Journal is running a press release, er, article about Sun's latest marcom that "Middleware is History". I suppose this phrase is in reaction to IBM's "Middleware is Everywhere" (witness the dueling billboards on Highway 101), but I don't think they're sending a positive message. The followups posted to this article are near universally negative. I realize that Sun is going...
on Feb 10, 2004
Version 1.0 of the XWork command processing framework and version 2.0 of the WebWork web application framework (which is built on top of XWork) have been released.
on Feb 9, 2004

Programming

So, I just attended Edge East 2004, a Web Services Conference here in scenic Boston. Full disclosure: I'm not exactly the world's biggest fan of the Web Services. My ten cents going in: they solve a very complex problem in a very complex way. And thus, they are to be feared. If you can, by any means, solve a simpler problem in a simpler way, you'll be happier. If you can, by any means, solve...
on Feb 26, 2004