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Blogs by topic J2EE and user simongbrown

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J2EE

Like Struts, WebWork is a framework that is fairly established within the J2EE webapp space although it's interesting that I've only ever come across two types of WebWork users - those that have never heard of it and those that love it. WebWork, like most other frameworks, is designed around the web MVC pattern and uses the command and controller implementation strategy. What's slightly...
on Mar 24, 2006
Guillermo Castro has posted a Wicket implementation of the webapp comparison that I started a while ago. It's an interesting read and the contrast with most page/request based webapp frameworks is amazing. In summary, Guillermo says: Wicket, in my opinion, focuses the development efforts in the right place, inside plain Java code, and leaves the graphical presentation where it should be,...
on Mar 9, 2006
Struts is the grandaddy of Java webapp frameworks so it's fitting that we start our tour here. I think it's probably safe to say that Struts was the first model 2 (web MVC) framework to gain widespread adoption in the Java arena and to this day it's still used by many people. Just to ensure everybody is up to speed, model 2/web MVC is an architectural pattern that promotes separation of...
on Jan 26, 2006
For completeness, I wanted to show how the JSP pages from the JSTL version could be written using the JSP XML syntax. Unsurprisingly, many people don't even know of its existence and, as I've blogged before, there aren't that many situations where you'd want to use it to write pages by hand. Should you need to, here are a couple of examples of how you would go about it using the XML syntax....
on Jan 12, 2006
It's been a while since the last blog entry, but let's continue our look at the webapp frameworks with another model 1 implementation, this time using the JavaServer Pages Standard Tag Library (JSTL). In Comparing webapp frameworks : Model 1 with scriptlets we saw that model 1 applications typically have some boilerplate code at the top of the page to "set the scene" and the use of scriptlets...
on Jan 10, 2006
Before we dive into the frameworks, I want to drop back to basics to give some context behind why the frameworks exist and what benefits they provide. For this reason, let's look at a naive model 1 implementation of the sample application. If you're already familiar with the whole model 1 vs. model 2 thing, you might want to skip reading this particular entry. Overview An in-depth explanation...
on Nov 23, 2005
Before we kick off our look at webapp frameworks, let's establish the domain model we're working with. It's pretty simple - blogs and blog entries, residing in a package called domain. Because I want to concentrate on the presentation aspects of the frameworks this time around, I'm ignoring the persistence mechanism. Instead, I'm just assuming that data access will be achieved via a "...
on Nov 9, 2005
So, to compare webapp frameworks we need an example web application. I've chosen to build a simple blog. Here are the functional requirements. The home page will display a list of the 3 most recent blog entries, in reverse chronological order. The following information will be displayed for each blog entry. Title If an excerpt is present, the excerpt will be displayed with a "read more" link...
on Nov 4, 2005
After posting Comparing webapp frameworks : Introduction yesterday, I got lots of feedback - some good, some bad. So, why am I doing this? First off, here are some of the negative comments. Imho this is a complete waste of time and it will be another biased comparison without any real use whatshowever. Please spend your time on something useful and don't add another confusing hyped...
on Nov 3, 2005
Struts, WebWork, Stripes, Spring MVC, Wicket, Tapestry, JSF, etc, or even rolling your own. With so many J2EE web application frameworks to choose from, how do you decide which one to use? Several articles (e.g. JavaServer Faces vs Tapestry) and presentations (e.g. Comparing Web Frameworks) already exist, but they generally concentrate on a small subset of the available frameworks. Over the...
on Nov 2, 2005
In Got Servlets?, Greg is asking what we'd like to see in the next major revision of the Java Servlets specification. In no particular order, here are my initial thoughts. Programmatic access to the security realm : There are more and more sites out there that offer users a way to sign up for their services and this is fairly tricky to do with the standard, declarative J2EE security model. If...
on Jul 14, 2005
It's still relatively early days for J2EE 1.4 in the real world, but compare the number of J2EE 1.4 implementations (6) with the number of J2EE 1.3 implementations (21). I remember that prior to the final J2EE 1.3 release, vendors seemed to be falling over themselves to get their implementations out but this doesn't seem to be happening anymore. Most J2EE app servers have some ability to support...
on Nov 2, 2004
I’ve been playing around with the various implementations of the security features in Servlet 2.3 compatible web containers. If you’ve ever built secure web applications, you’ll know that there are a handful of fairly useful methods on the HttpServletRequest interface. For example, the getUserPrincipal() method allows you to get access to the authenticated principal, as described by the...
on Nov 27, 2003
I've just installed Panther and since you don't get stuff like CVS installed by default, I decided to open up the XCode CD and install the developer tools. To my surprise there are some Java tools tucked away including Ant, XDoclet, log4j and JBoss. If you install the Java tools, they can be found in : Ant 1.5.3, XDoclet 1.2b and log4j 1.2.8 in /Developer/Java/J2EE JBoss 3.2.2 (RC2) in /Library...
on Oct 28, 2003
It's common that you'll find somebody using XDoclet to help build their EJBs, but how often do you find people using it to help with the J2EE web tier? In his recent weblog, Dave says he is trying to convince his team that using XDoclet is the way to go for generating artefacts like tag library descriptors and the web.xml file. I must admit that while XDoclet is very useful when building EJBs, I...
on Oct 16, 2003
I've been looking at integrating Apache and Tomcat on my PowerBook so that my dev environment more closely matches the box hosting my domain. Although I really do like open source, one of the biggest problems for me is that I always seem to need software that I have to build from the original source. This is one of the reasons I bought a Mac. I have tried running some of the various Linux...
on Oct 13, 2003
File access has always been a controversial activity within EJB-based applications because of the restrictions placed upon bean providers by the EJB specification. The part of the specification relevant here is under the section entitled Programming Restrictions, and it states the following about accessing the filing system. An enterprise bean must not use the java.io package to attempt to...
on Oct 8, 2003
Matt is looking for a way to test tag libraries and rather than write a lengthy comment, I thought I'd follow it up here. In the first part of his post, Matt says, ... I've looked briefly at TagUnit, but aren't you just writing JSPs (with custom tags) to test JSPs? In answer to this question, yes, you're exactly rght in saying that you're just writing JSPs. This is the essence of TagUnit, and...
on Oct 7, 2003
While Matt was talking about the Tomcat Service Manager, coincidentally, I was trying to install Tomcat 4 as a service on a Windows 2000 machine yesterday. For various reasons, I didn't want to install Tomcat via the .exe and therefore had to hunt around for the command line that installs the NT service. For (my) future reference, here it is, split over several lines for readability. set...
on Sep 26, 2003
Well ... it looks like our work on Professional JSP, 3rd Edition (previously titled Professional JSP 2.0, and now to be published by Apress) is almost at an end. It's currently slated for a September release and Amazon is now listing it, albeit with an incorrect authors list. I imagine that Sam, Dave, Matt and the other authors are looking forward to this being released as much as I am. If you...
on Aug 6, 2003