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Josh Marinacci

Josh Marinacci first tried Java in 1995 at the request of his favorite TA and never looked back. He is a blogger and co-author of Swing Hacks for O’Reilly. He is currently a Developer Advocate for the webOS at Palm, Inc. He previously worked on JavaFX, Swing, NetBeans, and client lead for the Java Store at Sun Microsystems. Josh lives in Eugene, Oregon and is passionate about open source technology & great user interfaces. He uses a Palm Pre, MacBook Pro, and Nikon D50 SLR to spread understanding of great design in software.

 

joshy's blog

Flying Saucer R7 is out

Posted by joshy on July 14, 2007 at 12:11 PM PDT

The Flying Saucer team is proud to announce that we have just released version R7 Final.

A Response to GUI Building: tool vs hand coded

Posted by joshy on June 14, 2007 at 10:52 AM PDT

The debate of hand coding your GUI screens versus using a tool has come up again. I suspect that Stuart wasn't expecting quite the volume response that he got. For some of you this is old hat and I suspect we aren't going to come to any conclusions here. I would like to say one thing, however.

Problem and solution for compiling NetBeans on Mac

Posted by joshy on May 17, 2007 at 8:45 AM PDT

What follows is a particular problem I had compiling NetBeans on my Mac and my solution to it. I'm putting this in my blog not so much for my readers but for the future generations of Google travelers who may stumble across this same issue.

I downloaded a fresh copy of the full NetBeans source and compiled it. This is what I got part-way through the compilation process:

Glossitope BoF slides

Posted by joshy on May 15, 2007 at 3:55 PM PDT

Due to a deluge of requests (both of them) here are the slides for our Awesome BoF 5000.

You can see them as a PDF or a QuickTime movie. I recommend the QuickTime if you can as it contains the rad transitions and animated jokes.

JavaOne: Another One is Done

Posted by joshy on May 11, 2007 at 12:43 PM PDT

It's Friday morning and I'm watching the James Gosling keynote from the bean bags in front of the big screen. I'd say this was the most exciting JavaOne I've ever been too. We really saw desktop Java in full force. Perhaps we shouldn't call it desktop anymore, since a form of Java SE is going to be available on phones and other non-desktop computers.

AB5k has a new name, and a JavaOne contest

Posted by joshy on May 10, 2007 at 12:33 PM PDT

The AB5k team is proud to announce that we are changing names to Glossitope. We have a new website up at www.glossitope.org where you can download new builds, see our promotional video, and play with the new graphical effects we built for JavaOne.

AB5k has a new name, and a JavaOne contest

Posted by joshy on May 9, 2007 at 3:20 PM PDT

The AB5k team is proud to announce that we are changing names to Glossitope. We have a new website up at www.glossitope.org where you can download new builds, see our promotional video, and play with the new graphical effects we built for JavaOne.

JSR 296 Session Success

Posted by joshy on May 8, 2007 at 9:13 PM PDT

Another quick update. Hans and I did our session on JSR 296 today and it was a huge success. We were completely packed, over 500 people I think!

More coming soon.

update

Here is John's coverage of our session. Thanks John.

NetBeans day success

Posted by joshy on May 8, 2007 at 7:57 AM PDT

Hey guys. Real quick. I just thought you'd like that we (the NetBeans GUI Builder team) showed Open Street Maps on stage at CommunityOne in front of about >400 people. We did a demo where we built a database application live on stage that combines famous sites in London with photos from WikiPedia and the JXMapKit running Open Street Maps.

Beans binding rocks!

Posted by joshy on May 3, 2007 at 10:27 PM PDT

I was working on one of our NetBeans demos for Monday's Matisse session and it occurred to me. I was actually having fun putting together a little program! I grabbed some of our cool little beans from SwingLabs then wired them up to some text fields using zero code. Just binding expressions created visually using NetBeans M9. It was really easy and kinda fun.