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Ben Galbraith

Ben Galbraith is a frequent technical speaker, occasional consultant, and author of several Java-related books. He is a co-founder of Ajaxian.com, an experienced Chief Technical Officer and Enterprise Java Architect, and is presently a consultant specializing in enterprise architecture and Swing/Ajax development. Ben wrote his first computer program when he was six years old, started his first business at ten, and entered the IT workforce just after turning twelve. For the past few years, he's been professionally coding in Java. In 2005, Ben delivered over a hundred technical presentations at venues including JavaOne, JavaPolis, and the No Fluff Just Stuff Java Symposiums.

 

javaben's blog

Suddenly, it all makes sense...

Posted by javaben on May 12, 2005 at 7:54 AM PDT

Kudos to Dion for being the first I've seen to point this out. Says he:

Interestingly, it seems like it was lead by good 'ole Geir Magnusson.

Maybe nothing was read into that when the proposal came out.

Ajax, and Mobile Phone Fatigue

Posted by javaben on May 9, 2005 at 10:36 AM PDT

This is not a blog about Ajax. But, I'm with Dion Almaer at the Adaptive Path / O'Reilly Ajax Summit. We'll be blogging about it at www.ajaxian.com. Check it out.

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I have fond memories of my first JavaOne conference in 2001.

Microsoft Technical Summit, Threads, and Swing

Posted by javaben on April 9, 2005 at 12:51 PM PDT

Like a few other vocal bloggers, I attended the recent Microsoft Technical Summit (a.k.a. Developer Influential Seminar, a.k.a. Java/.NET Interop Event).

Finally... Interactive JavaDocs

Posted by javaben on August 10, 2004 at 9:06 AM PDT

Over the past few weeks, I've watched with anticipation as Rick Ross and Matt Schmidt from Javalobby have put together jdocs.com, an on-line JavaDoc search engine. As the site has matured in recent days, I've enjoyed using it in place of my downloaded JavaDocs.

Is an avalanche coming?

Posted by javaben on April 13, 2004 at 7:36 PM PDT

Computers have undoubtedly and dramatically raised the productivity of businesses world-wide. Yet for all the increased profits that technology can inject into the bottom line, it has a nasty habit of turning around and grabbing fist-fulls of cash back out of the balance sheet (witness Microsoft's massive cash hoard).

Commoditization of Basic IT Infrastructure is a Bad Thing?

Posted by javaben on February 10, 2004 at 8:36 PM PST

I feel like I'm swimming upstream against a tide of derision from my peers, but unlike so many who disagreed with Jonathan Schwartz's recent article/editorial/advertisement on JDJ, I think what Jonathan said makes a lot o

Java in Your Stereo?

Posted by javaben on January 17, 2004 at 4:19 PM PST

For the past few weeks, I've been playing with MacSense's new HomePod device.