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• Sun RFID and Sensor  • [no association]  


Java Web Services and XML

Well, I kind of know the XML code inside out ;-), so I knew beforehand that a SAX parser closes the stream it reads. So I just mostly wrote a simple program to confirm the socket behavior. Also, I think I know about TCP probably more than average developers. That probably have helped, too. Mostly I just verified that calling socket.getInputStream().close() brings down the whole connection. This...
on Jul 22, 2005
Asynchronous JavaScript and XML (AJAX) is an increasingly popular technology that enables HTML pages to asynchronously make calls to the server from which the pages were loaded and fetch XML documents. You can then update the XML documents by means of JavaScript to revise the Document Object Model (DOM). A recent article that I cowrote with two Sun engineers, Asynchronous Rendering of Portlet...
on Jul 15, 2005
Yesterday, one of the JAXB users sent me an e-mail, asking for how to solve the problem he faced. The scenario was like this; you have a client and a server, and you want a client to send an XML document to a server (through a good ol' TCP socket), then a server sends back an XML document. A very simple use case that should just work. The problem he had is that unless the client sends the "EOS...
on Jul 15, 2005
The JAXB RI distribution ships with xjc.sh and xjc.bat for invoking XJC from a command prompt. JWSDP also has xjc.sh and xjc.bat, but their contents are different. I'm sure these files are there for a reason, but personally, I hate those scripts. Here are why. One, it's hard to set the JVM parameters, even though sometimes you need to increase the VM memory size to have XJC compile a large...
on Jul 14, 2005
Based upon the discussion in FI project, I created a new sample that starts with a doc/lit WSDL. I tried this sample with Tomcat container and JWSDP 1.6. Configuration file (Download in conf/Catalina/localhost directory) Zipped directory (unzip in jaxrpc/samples directory) As with the other sample, build target builds the WAR file and run-client target build and runs the client. This...
on Jul 13, 2005

JDDAC

I came across an announcement for IBM's Faces for Laszlo this morning. I haven't had time to delve into the details, but my impression is that they're "filling in" some of the missing Rich Internet Application pieces that I've wanted for a long time. My professional introduction to Java was through Applets and JSP pages. I needed browser components that were "snazzy" and "dynamic". In my case...
on Jul 22, 2005

Open JDK

Yesterday I talked about how you can use WeakReference to allow a resource to be garbage collected even if it is referenced by another object, a JMX MBean in the case in question. In fact, you can use dynamic proxies to provide a more general framework for this sort of situation. In the specific situation I was discussing before, you have a resource such as a...
on Jul 21, 2005
Suppose (to take my favourite example), you have some sort of cache, and you want to be able to control it via an MBean. You might have something a bit like this: public interface CacheControlMBean {    public int getSize();}public class CacheControl implements CacheControlMBean {    public CacheControl(Cache cache) {      ...
on Jul 20, 2005
One of the changes we made in version 1.1 of the JMX API, way back in early 2002, was to modify the serialization of certain classes. Because remote access was not part of the API at this time, this aspect had been a bit neglected in version 1.0, with the result that certain classes had underspecified or inefficient serial forms. Other implementations of the API could and did have incompatible...
on Jul 19, 2005
The short answer is: you can, but you probably shouldn't. Here's why. To be clear, here's the sort of thing I'm talking about: CacheControlMBean mbean = new CacheControl(thingyCache);mbeanServer.registerMBean(mbean, objectName1);mbeanServer.registerMBean(mbean, objectName2); This will work, and the same MBean will be accessible through both objectName1 and objectName2. So why...
on Jul 16, 2005
JavaOne is always a huge buzz, and this year was no exception. Of course the technical sessions are very worthwhile, so it's great news that slides and audio for all of them will be available free online. In previous years you had to pay a small subscription fee to access them. But the biggest plus of JavaOne, like any conference, is meeting people with common interests. I brought back a...
on Jul 13, 2005

NetBeans

Of course, the answer is yes to both questions, but I'm talking about Project GlassFish. It has relevance to Prague because it was during our team trip there in May that I worked feverishly to ensure the project didn't go live without tools support - a necessity to any successful project, right? We essentially spent the week in a conference room planning the next release of NetBeans and I kept...
on Jul 20, 2005

Java Enterprise

In my last blog's comments, Chris Mahan posited that Sun would send lawyers after a hapless coder, nashing their tiny little sharp teeth. Since this isn't generally how things work - I thought I'd blog a bit on this here: How many times have you seen a discussion on mailling lists, forums or blogs which says "If I do that with my source code, company X is going to sue me". Well, relax. The...
on Jul 20, 2005
With Sun's decision to "Open Source" their Java EE app server, it's likely that all Java EE app servers will soon be free. JBoss, JOnAS, Geronimo and Sun's GlassFish are going to exert huge pressure on the holdouts IBM, BEA and Oracle. IBM and BEA are already formulating responses, as is witnessed by the announcements of IBM support and BEA support for Geronimo, but it's hard to believe that...
on Jul 8, 2005

Java Desktop

This has to be one of the coolest frame hacks I've run across. I also think this is a great use of a gestural interface techniques. The idea is that you can fold windows down to access what is behind them. They have a small java application (54k) that does everything. http://liihs.irit.fr/dragice/foldndrop/
on Jul 19, 2005
JavaOne 2005, Moscone Hall in San Francisco, Thursday at 2:30. It was the very end of a very long week. A week that ended on June 29th and began in March. Chet Haase and I had just debuted the GUI Puzzlers technical session and despite some lunch and wandering around, we were both exhausted. We took our seats for the last desktop session on the last day of the conference. Weaker men would...
on Jul 15, 2005
Java One Lessons The highlights for me were our session for Swing Hacks and meeting with customers at the JDIC and JDNC booths (more on that in my next blog). It's great to interact with developers (my "customers" essentially) and get some real feedback. The session for Swing Hacks went quite well. I was incredibly nervous (I've never spoken in front of more than 50 people before), but calmed...
on Jul 15, 2005
As I reported a few months back in my STR-Crazy entry, Mustang b27 included an improved, single-threaded implementation of the OpenGL-based Java2D pipeline. With those changes came improved stability and performance (surprisingly). But that work also opened the door for even more performance improvements, mainly because the code was much more centralized and easier to build on. So with that...
on Jul 14, 2005
Versioning, which I'm defining for this entry as how a Java application manages its external library dependencies, has been a tough issue ever since Java first released. Back when Java was born, the vision was that each machine would have a single Java runtime and standard libraries which would always be fully backwards-compatible. The reality has been that for most apps, the only reasonable...
on Jul 13, 2005

Embedded

This online article by by Mukesh Lulla, TeamF1 is a pretty good overview of the top 10 misconceptions about embedded security. It's worth mentioning here for a couple of reasons. One: embedded security is increasingly important as more embedded products are provided with a network connection to the outside world. Two: it's generally accepted that the various Java security packages are "better"...
on Jul 8, 2005