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Java Web Services and XML

Sun Java Web Services (JWS) engineers are working with Microsoft Windows Communication Foundation (WCF) engineers to ensure interoperability of enterprise features. such as security, reliable messaging and atomic transactions. At Sun, we call this work "Project Tango" and like to think of Duke doing the dance. This is accomplished by implementing a number of WS-* specifications and holding...
on Feb 9, 2006
Microsoft posted an announcement for Windows Communication Foundation (a.k.a. Indigo) interop plug-fest. We, at Sun, care a lot about Web services interoperability and thus will be participating in the plug-fest to demonstrate interoperability with Indigo. All the technologies that we will be participating with, will be using Glassfish as the container. We will be bigger and better than the last...
on Feb 6, 2006
A new "Meet the Engineer" Q&A I did with a java.net blogger appears on java.sun.com here if you want to check it out: (http://java.sun.com/developer/Meet-Eng/kawaguchi/) I interviewed Kohsuke Kawaguchi, who has worked with XML schema languages since 2001, including specification work on RELAX NG and W3C XML Schema, and implementation work in a number of related Java artifacts, including JAXB...
on Feb 2, 2006
Yesterday I spent the morning at the SDForum Interoperability Forum. Two Sun engineers, Graham Hamilton and Nick Kassem, participated in two different panels. The interop discussions are directly related to the Sun/Microsoft Web Services interop effort I'll be talking about in this blog. Here are my notes on the event. Keynote The morning started with Anne Thomas Manes of the Burton Group...
on Feb 1, 2006
Asynchronous Services are a fact of life, and a key requirement for successful SOA solutions. Doug Kaye summed it up well in his book, Loosely Coupled: The Missing Pieces of Web Services: "Many of the benefits of web services can't be realized until asynchronous interaction becomes well understood and widely practiced, and some high-value applications can't be deployed properly or at all without...
on Feb 1, 2006
JAX-WS has simplified the development of Web Service clients when compared to JAX-RPC. Both technologies have a tool for importing a WSDL to generate client side artifacts. JAX-RPC's tool is wscompile, JAX-WS' tool is wsimport. To use wscompile a config.xml file must be created to pass to wscompile. A simple config.xml file would look something like: <?xml version="1.0"...
on Jan 31, 2006
Thanks to keen users, I have been able to fix a bunch of bugs and improves usability significantly for the past few months. Thank you to all who has sent me feedbacks. One touchstone for a library like com4j is to handle Microsoft Office type libraries nicely. It's a huge library (actually a set of libraries) that uses many interesting COM features (such as default property, enumeration, safe...
on Jan 28, 2006
Hanson Char wrote a nice plugin for JAXB RI 2.0 that causes XJC to generate additional methods, which are very useful when you are building object tree in memory. I like that it allows you to write the same code in a concise way. See the plugin page for more details. It's also worth noting that the code that uses this plugin can still run with any JAXB2 implementation.
on Jan 27, 2006
Hello. My name is Harold Carr. I'm the engineering lead for Sun's Java Web Services interoperability project with Microsoft's Windows Communication Foundation (WCF). We initially unveiled this project in November 2005. Sun engineers are interacting with Microsoft engineers to ensure interoperability in areas such as reliable messaging, security and atomic transactions. In upcoming blog...
on Jan 26, 2006
Do you know the difference between Web Service Orchestration and Web Service Choreography? The distinction between WS-Orchestration and WS-Choreography is important to understand, but unfortunately the vocabulary that we are defining for dealing with web services and SOA is... uh... (How shall I put it?)... unhelpful. One definition that I found for "orchestration" on the web is the following: "...
on Jan 19, 2006
Mustang has a very good support for Web Services. One can create, publish a Web Service very easily. First write the Web Service endpoint implementation, and then use javax.xml.ws.Endpoint API to create and publish the Web Service. package myws;import javax.jws.WebService;import javax.jws.soap.SOAPBinding;@WebService@SOAPBinding(style=SOAPBinding.Style.RPC)public class Implementor {  ...
on Jan 18, 2006
The EA3 version of JAX-WS or the JAX-WS released in JWSDP 2.0, supports the publishing and use RESTful Web Services. Here is an example that shows how to publish a RESTful Web Service using JAX-WS. Publishing a RESTful Web Service with JAX-WS starts by creating an implementation of the javax.xml.ws.Provider<T> interface. The Provider interface is the dynamic alternative to a...
on Jan 17, 2006
XInclude is really just a very simple filtering. So all you need is a bit of SAX programming to put together pieces in the right order. The idea is that you parse XML, run it through XInclude filter (that expands inclusion), then feed it to JAXB unmarshaller. By using xincluder, it would be: <xmp>import com.elharo.xml.xinclude.XIncludeFilter;import javax.xml.bind.*;JAXBContext context...
on Jan 13, 2006
The JAXB project started posting its jars (both the RI and the API jars) to the java.net maven repository. Although the JAXB project itself doesn't use Maven, I've been personally using Maven a lot for many of my smaller hobby projects. So I know how useful it can be, and I hate when I have to download jars like activation.jar or mail.jar from sun website so that I can build Maven-based...
on Jan 3, 2006
Java API for XML Web Services Addressing (JAX-WSA) 1.0 Early Access is now available. Read more about the bundled samples and documentation here. Technorati: jwsdp jaxwsa Web Services WSAddressing
on Dec 29, 2005
I just posted the JAX-WS 2.0 early access 3 on java.net. This is the release has been extensively tested and only a one known bug exists. Hopefully this will be the last early access release before the specification goes final, so this is your last chance to download JAX-WS and tell us what you think. In this release new support for RESTful Web Services has been added. A simple restful sample...
on Dec 23, 2005
I just posted the early access 3 release of JAXB RI 2.0 on java.net. What I really like about this version is that it's released under the CDDL, so you can play with it, use it, redistribute it, bundle it into your app, etc, etc, freely. Even though it's EA, it's extensively tested --- roughly 1800 tests including all those industry schemas, contributed schemas, regression test cases --- and...
on Dec 23, 2005
In an effort to be more open about the development of JAX-WS, discussions about changes to JAX-WS are now happening on dev@jax-ws.dev.java.net. Up until recently, such discussions had been going on internally within Sun. We encourage those interested in participating in these discussions to join the mailing list. To subscribe to the list, send a message to: dev-subscribe@jax-ws.dev.java.net
on Dec 20, 2005
Bobby Bissett has written a white paper entitled "Building JAX-WS 2.0 Services with NetBeans." This is an excellent white paper for those wishing to get started using JAX-WS. If any of you have wanted to try JAX-WS but are not sure where to get started, this white paper gives you step-by-step instructions on configuring NetBeans to run JAX-WS and building a simple Web Service endpoint and a Web...
on Dec 13, 2005
In an earlier blog, I started a discussion about DOM vs. JAXB performance. For that purpose, I selected 4 different XML schemas, including 3 standard ones: UBL, FPML and GAML; in addition, I picked about 20 XML instances with sizes ranging from 1K to 924K and looked at number of Mbits per second I could process on a modern 2-way Opteron server. The results showed DOM coming just ahead of JAXB in...
on Dec 12, 2005