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Java Desktop

I hear from my friend Neal that the webcast next Tuesday showing Java Desktop System should be good. Apparently Jonathan Schwartz and Peder Ulander will be showing several demos of JDS in action and also demoing the Looking Glass 3D desktop prototype (which Hideya continues to enhance - he's added a panning virtual desktop now as well and is exploring using the reverse of windows to display...
on Jan 29, 2004
Microsoft is redefining the application interface around rich clients, and if Java does not have an answer, it faces being cut off from end users. The answer lies in matching Microsoft's richness while trumping it on security. FYI, I just published an article in Java Developers Journal: The Rich Client Strikes Back.
on Jan 15, 2004
My friend Max has a new 17" Powerbook so we spent the afternoon gathering the extra software he wanted to get up to fully productive speed. Among the downloads was NeoOffice/J v0.7.1, Patrick Luby's latest release of his Java-front-ended OpenOffice.org. The new version loads and runs way faster than the previous one and I'd really recommend it to Mac users as its compatibility with MS Office is...
on Jan 4, 2004
I've been playing with Swing a lot lately for my new series of articles. In my research I came across another interesting class java.awt.Robot. It's a class that can automate the UI, mainly for testing. One particularly cool feature is the mouseMove function. Once I saw this I got evil ideas. :) Imagine rogue java programs that move the mouse cursor to mystify and befuddle the user. Spelling...
on Dec 9, 2003
Well, Sun is releasing their so-called Java Desktop System this week. What, exactly, is the "Java Desktop System"? Plain and simple: it is Sun's Linux distribution focused on desktop users. Of course, Sun has too much invested in things like Solaris (which is losing market share since The Bust (and I'm not even going into the loss of mind share)) and Java for them to be clear in their...
on Dec 1, 2003
True confession: I love my Mozilla mail filter panel.(For non-mozilla users, this is the ever-present textfield that filters my message headers as I type, making it so very easy to find messages quickly). I'm also wildly fond of browser smart-fields that use auto-complete to recall my userid/password at the umpteen different websites where my memory always shorts. Auto-complete in general has...
on Nov 18, 2003
Introduction I have recently embarked on a fairly significant project. I took some time to research various frameworks and developers' opinions on the matter of writing user interfaces. I was not only looking for opinions how to write an intuitive user interface, but also on methods or techniques for designing user interfaces that produce manageable code. I read some of Allen Holub's articles...
on Oct 30, 2003
When starting a new project, the User Interface decision is always a big one. Should we use Swing? Or should we develop a web-based solution? Some also are correct to argue that web-based doesn't necessarily imply HTML-based. Macromedia-based web solutions are not only viable but a real player. In certain circumstances, the requirements make the choice fairly clear, possibly even mandated...
on Oct 21, 2003
While we're celebrating the third birthday of OpenOffice.org, I'd like to pass huge congratulations to Patrick Luby on the release of v0.7 of NeoOffice/J for Mac OS X. He has single-handedly written a highly usable front-end for the Mac OS X port of OpenOffice.org 1.0.3 (itself an enormous achievement - credit especially to Ed Peterlin and Dan Williams) so that it doesn't require X11 to use. This...
on Oct 13, 2003
Avalon gives Microsoft an opportunity to demonstrate its leverage over the user experience and to shake up competitors. There is a lot of buzz in the Microsoft community these days in advance of the first public educational events around 'Avalon', one of the many new pieces of the Longhorn version of Windows. Avalon is the new Windows API, and it apparently represents a major jump in UI...
on Sep 29, 2003
Do not expect any order or rhyme or reason for the content that follows. I've been away from the blogging game for several weeks, so I have a lot of random thoughts waiting to jump out of my dome (in typical fashion, none of them are well formed). Chet and Hans have been cranking out new blogs left and right, so I feel compelled to keep up with my end-of-the-hall-mates. On the new OpenGL-...
on Sep 18, 2003
I originally wrote this as one single blog, but as I found out with my previous BufferedImage articles, I tend to go on much longer than I inteded at first, so I had to split it up. So now there's 2 parts to this blog: last time's VolatileImage usage discussion, and this week's VolatileImage FAQ. This week, I thought I'd write down various reasonable questions about either VolatileImage...
on Sep 17, 2003
Way back when we were first implementing the VolatileImage API, I had asked to come to the Swing staff meeting so that I could explain about the new VolatileImage API and why Swing should start using it. I got up to the whiteboard, drew some pictures (probably horrible, but it's just a crutch for me when I explain things). I described this new image type, boiling it down to its basics: It'...
on Sep 9, 2003
Speculation on a strategy for Microsoft to co-opt Linux Pardon the title. I'm not actually calling anyone stupid. Just couldn't resist co-opting President Clinton's '92 campaign theme. While writing my previous blog entry on .NET on Linux, I started thinking about what makes up an operating system. Certainly there is the kernel, there are system services, and there is the developer API....
on Sep 4, 2003
A few weeks ago I attended LinuxWorld up in San Francisco. I marched around the tradeshow and took notes about what I saw, notably the impressive collection of desktop Java applications on display. If I was a good blogger or even a disciplined one, I would have immediately collected my impressions and published them. Sadly I'm easily distracted and rarely disciplined and so my little...
on Sep 3, 2003
Let Java play to its strengths and co-opt Microsoft’s advantages In the previous parts of this series on Java vs. Microsoft .NET, I lay out the threat that .NET poses to the Java ecosystem and the advantages on which Microsoft is relying to carry out that threat. So…what is the response to this threat? Those of you who know me already know what I’m going to say: rich thin...
on Aug 26, 2003
Part II, in which we discuss the internal performance implications of said image type Let's dive briefly into some of the performance implications with BufferedImages (because I'm writing this and I tend to wind up in the performance arena no matter what I'm talking about). There is currently only one image type that we guarantee acceleration on (if possible on the runtime platform):...
on Aug 21, 2003
Recently there was a brief discussion on the java2d interest list. We were talking about some of uses of BufferedImage and someone replied to the group with their epiphany on these objects with just a brief: "BufferedImage as good as butter!" The Java2D team has spent the last few days trying to understand and come to terms with this phrase. Was it praise? Irony? Sarcasm? An epigram? A...
on Aug 14, 2003
Seeing as how this is my first blog, I thought it was reasonable to go on a complete tangent instead of spending my soapbox time rambling on about upcoming features and cool Java graphics things. Maybe I'll get into that stuff in a later column... For years now, we've been hearing about how Patterns and Components will make our code much better, easier, reusable, etc. etc. etc. (etc.). But I...
on Aug 8, 2003
Yes, you can support both In his post, Widgets follow form follows function, Chris Adamson ably describes the dilemma many software designers face when trying to design applications that support both novices and power users. In my post, Brittan’s Rules of Software Usability, I introduce the idea that software usability strategies can be seen through the application of three concepts:...
on Aug 4, 2003