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Chris DiBona

Chris DiBona is the cofounder of both Konstrux Technologies, which implements gforge for companies, and its sister company, Damage Studios. He also co-edited the O'Reilly book Open Sources: Voices from the Open Source Software Revolution and was an editor at Slashdot.org for some time, where he also ran the polls and can be found on TechTV where he does Linux segments for The ScreenSavers.

 

cdibona's blog

Some final words about distribution divergence...and a request for Java Gotchas..

Posted by cdibona on July 21, 2004 at 5:34 AM PDT

A few weeks ago, I wrote about distribution divergence and that spawned what I thought was a pretty terrific comment stream, so thanks. I wanted to talk just a smidgen more about this, something I consider very important.

Regarding Distribution Divergence....

Posted by cdibona on July 3, 2004 at 12:44 PM PDT

At JavaOne, Gosling, Brian Behlendorf and IBM's Rod Smith among others had a discussion about the merits of Open Sourcing Java.

Java and Linux, Joined at the Hip for Java Newbies

Posted by cdibona on June 22, 2004 at 12:38 PM PDT

First, some housekeeping:

1000th Java.net project:

jBob pointed out that the 1000th java.net project was approved a few days ago. It is part of the linux.java.net project community, and can be found here:

https://javafirmware.dev.java.net/

Some Unsolicited Advice for Jonathan Schwartz and our Friends at Sun

Posted by cdibona on June 1, 2004 at 10:47 AM PDT

In a recent article, Sun President Jonathan Schwartz stated that he saw Red Hat as being a proprietary company, more so than Sun.

If the settlement came on the 1st, would you have beleived it?

Posted by cdibona on April 2, 2004 at 11:26 AM PST

If the settlement had come
yesterday, would anyone have believed it? Sun and Microsoft settled their century
long trial with a somewhat largish payment of $1.6b changing hands as part of the
deal. The money is a handy thing, I'd imagine, but the funny thing was that both
parties said they would collaborate on technology, etc, etc....

Scott is Wrong About Open Sourcing Java, But we Knew That Going Into This

Posted by cdibona on March 24, 2004 at 9:57 PM PST

While it is no shocker, Sun CEO Scott McNealy has made his decision very public, Java will not be open sourced. If you follow the link (above) you can see the report on his speech on Government Computer News. I haven't found the text of the whole speech online, so I'll only talk about what was reported there and elsewhere.

Papers, Please ....

Posted by cdibona on March 12, 2004 at 12:42 PM PST

Hi everyone, after some talking with my colleague Art, we would like to extend an invitation for papers and abstracts for articles for the site. We are particularly interested in articles about the different JVMs out there for Linux , with a specific eye towards compatibility and performance concerns. You can email them to me at chris@dibona.com

Is JAS ruining the Java learning experience?

Posted by cdibona on March 2, 2004 at 1:52 PM PST

While I'm certainly not the first person to comment on it, one of the things that deflated my usual new-language euphoria was the vast collection of acronyms that Java brings with it. I'm not going to spend much time complaining about this, as I know how banal and trite that is , but it struck me as being a definite road block to the usually enjoyable experience of learning a new language.

Welcome, part 2....

Posted by cdibona on February 3, 2004 at 4:40 PM PST

Last week, I spoke about the mission for linux.java.net as being bringing Java on Linux up to par with Java deployed and developed on Solaris, NT and others. The other mission, the yin to the yang of cross platform portability, is the linux (and open source) -specific things. For instance , a library to manage or interface with the /proc or /dev filesystems.

Welcome to linux.java.net

Posted by cdibona on January 21, 2004 at 6:18 PM PST

Welcome to linux.java.net and ... what are we trying to accomplish here?

Welcome to linux.java.net! We're launching this site with a simple mission, to ensure that Linux becomes and remains a first-tier platform for Java, enjoying equality and parity with other operating systems like Solaris.