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Calvin Austin

Calvin Austin is chief architect and director of engineering at SpikeSource.com. He previously led the J2SE 5.0 release at Sun Microsystems and also led Sun's Java on Linux port.

 

calvinaustin's blog

JAVA stock ticker change - what's next?

Posted by calvinaustin on August 24, 2007 at 10:14 AM PDT

Not since the proposed Java 2000 have I had a good whole hearted laugh at Java. My colleagues couldn't believe it either. When I was at Sun there were some interesting economic ideas about reducing costs and improving the stock price, many were based on financial statistics and few that I can remember had any impact. Maybe some new starbucks investors may accidently select the wrong stock?

Dirty secrets of computer engineering

Posted by calvinaustin on July 10, 2007 at 5:11 PM PDT

Imagine taking your car into the shop, they call back saying you need to apply a manufacturers fix to the fuel injection system, it may not fail now but soon. Instead you say, "No way! I put one of those fixes on before and it took a week to get the car working again!"

OK, my example isn't perfect but in the software world we are trending towards the wrong end of trouble-free updates.

Java on Fiesty Ubuntu - will anyone notice?

Posted by calvinaustin on April 20, 2007 at 5:48 PM PDT

I've been busy working on our Web 2.0 release so didn't have time to update my laptop until now. I was generally happy with my Ubuntu breezy 64bit install, I had the JDK on there, Java worked in firefox 32bit, I could remotely display my screen to a projector and my broadcom wireless card even worked with ndiswrapper.

Now I had a few days to spare I decided to upgrade my system.

The unwritten story of open source java

Posted by calvinaustin on November 15, 2006 at 12:55 PM PST

What Sun finally did this week by releasing Java under GPL was a historic event. Using the GPL instead of yet another Sun license certainly makes adoption that much easier. But why did it take so long and why the change now?

I left Sun in 2004 after 8 fun years at Javasoft. Open Source Java was a annual discussion at Sun and in many conversations with open source advocates and companies.

What PHP needs to learn from Java

Posted by calvinaustin on July 26, 2006 at 11:24 AM PDT

We all know that there isn't a single language or platform that is totally secure, much in the same way that no matter how well you secure your house, its still possible to leave a door unlocked.

Java and the Titanic

Posted by calvinaustin on May 17, 2006 at 4:05 PM PDT

Nothing to do with the Mythbusters but the titanic really was outside Javaone today before being lifted on top of the Metreon.

Javaone: w/images Java SE and Java EE keynote pt2

Posted by calvinaustin on May 16, 2006 at 3:26 PM PDT

Java EE 5 for many of you is a big step forward to unifying the Java EE platform. The removal of application specific deployment scriptors should be very welcome, something that has always been a barrier between moving between applications. Learning deployment in Geronimo for example is just one extra tasks developers don't want to learn.

Javaone: w/images Java SE and Java EE keynote pt1

Posted by calvinaustin on May 16, 2006 at 1:01 PM PDT

Now listening to the Java SE and EE keynote. Graham is revisting the core features of Java 6. Which includes some GUI clean-up for windows and updates for Windows Vista.

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The GUI looks nice and 10 years on the gray/grey rectangle is gone.

Javaone news highlights. Open Source Java

Posted by calvinaustin on May 16, 2006 at 9:29 AM PDT

So Jonathan has taken stage. The first item he wanted to discuss was Suns Niagara hardware sparc try and buy program so that you can now download free hardware.

Next came one of the conference sponsors, Ed Zander with Motorola who picked up a duke choice for a Motorola phone. Then the JDK java distro license change was introduced by Mark Shuttleworth of Ubuntu fame.

Javaone news: Java on Linux the real story

Posted by calvinaustin on May 16, 2006 at 8:12 AM PDT

One of the first Big community Javaone items this year wasn't the Open Source Java news but a new license for the JDK on Linux. Now I really believe this is a good thing, not enough, but an improvement.