Skip to main content

Alex Winston

Alex Winston is a Senior Software Engineer with ComFrame Software Corporation located in Nashville, TN. He focuses on emerging open source technologies and design patterns and is activaly involved in the Middle Tennessee Java Users Group. He regularly participates in discussion and design of various technologies within the java community and evangalizes the choice that java provides

 

alexwinston's blog

Closure Syntax

Posted by alexwinston on February 27, 2008 at 11:00 AM PST

I would like to preface this entry with the fact that I am not suggesting a concrete syntax in the examples below. I am merely using the examples as talking points and illustrations of what I consider to be the "syntactical spirit" of the Java language.

Nashville Java Conference Speakers Needed

Posted by alexwinston on May 30, 2007 at 8:29 AM PDT

Java speakers are needed for an upcoming conference, http://devlink.net, in Nashville, Tennessee. We currently only have 2-3 committed Java speakers and are far outnumbered by .Net speakers. If you or someone you know would like to speak at a regionally sponsored event please contact me immediately.

Strongly Typed Java Delegates

Posted by alexwinston on April 11, 2005 at 2:54 PM PDT

Weakly typed sudo java delegate implementations seem to be a dime a dozen these days. After reading the latest article on JDJ http://sys-con.com/story/?storyid=49097&DE=1 about yet another weakly typed implementation for java delegates I decided it was high time to put my brain to work on implementing strongly typed delegates.

Functional objects made even easier with tiger

Posted by alexwinston on January 20, 2005 at 3:02 PM PST

As a followup to my initial post I have included generics within Predicate(s) to make them virtually resistent to ClassCastException(s).

Functional objects made easy with tiger

Posted by alexwinston on January 19, 2005 at 6:49 AM PST

After reading CrazyBob's article about sudo closures in java some time ago I made
it a point to familiarize myself with this particular idiom as well as others that
are often talked about but rarely used within the java community.