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Blog Archive for simongbrown during November 2005

Before we dive into the frameworks, I want to drop back to basics to give some context behind why the frameworks exist and what benefits they provide. For this reason, let's look at a naive model 1 implementation of the sample application. If you're already familiar with the whole model 1 vs. model 2 thing, you might want to skip reading this particular entry. Overview An in-depth explanation...
Before we kick off our look at webapp frameworks, let's establish the domain model we're working with. It's pretty simple - blogs and blog entries, residing in a package called domain. Because I want to concentrate on the presentation aspects of the frameworks this time around, I'm ignoring the persistence mechanism. Instead, I'm just assuming that data access will be achieved via a "...
So, to compare webapp frameworks we need an example web application. I've chosen to build a simple blog. Here are the functional requirements. The home page will display a list of the 3 most recent blog entries, in reverse chronological order. The following information will be displayed for each blog entry. Title If an excerpt is present, the excerpt will be displayed with a "read more" link...
After posting Comparing webapp frameworks : Introduction yesterday, I got lots of feedback - some good, some bad. So, why am I doing this? First off, here are some of the negative comments. Imho this is a complete waste of time and it will be another biased comparison without any real use whatshowever. Please spend your time on something useful and don't add another confusing hyped...
Struts, WebWork, Stripes, Spring MVC, Wicket, Tapestry, JSF, etc, or even rolling your own. With so many J2EE web application frameworks to choose from, how do you decide which one to use? Several articles (e.g. JavaServer Faces vs Tapestry) and presentations (e.g. Comparing Web Frameworks) already exist, but they generally concentrate on a small subset of the available frameworks. Over the...