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Blog Archive for johnsmart during May 2009

Selenium is a widely-used and very useful tool for automated web testing. This article is a very short primer designed to get you up and running Selenium Tests in Groovy in your Maven projects. The examples assume you are running your Selenium tests against an existing web server (say an integration or staging server). In this case, I typically set up a dedicated Maven project to do the job....
In case you missed it, JavaOne is on next week. There are some great sessions as usual, and it should be a great opportunity for catching up with old and/or virtual friends, and networking in general. So, as some others have done, I've decided to publish my intended JavaOne agenda: So if anyone wants to catch up while I'm in San Francisco, just give a yell!
This case study is the seventh of an 8-part blog series about why so many developers adopt continuous integration, and originally published on the Atlassian blogs. It naturally has a bit of a Bamboo slant to it (if you look close enough, you can even see the odd panda), but the issues discussed apply to any team trying to adopt modern development practices, no matter what CI tool is used. Clever...
This case study is the sixth of an 8-part blog series about why so many developers adopt continuous integration, and originally published on the Atlassian blogs. It naturally has a bit of a Bamboo slant to it (if you look close enough, you can even see the odd panda), but the issues discussed apply to any team trying to adopt modern development practices, no matter what CI tool is used....
Someone recently asked me about how I organised releases in our Subversion repository. So I decided to write up the response as a blog entry. This article describes how we have set up Continuous Integration and release management for a medium size web project for one of our clients. The approaches described here represent some typical practices that are (I think) fairly commonnly used for...
To the tune of 'Money for nothing', by Dire Straits. Now look at them coders, that's the way you do itYou code in Groovy in that IDEThat ain't workin' that's the way you do itGet your lines of code for nothin' get your screens for freeNow that ain't workin' that's the way you do itLemme tell ya them dudes are coolMaybe write twenty lines for your domain...
This case study is the fifth of an 8-part blog series about why so many developers adopt continuous integration, and originally published on the Atlassian blogs. It naturally has a bit of a Bamboo slant to it (if you look close enough, you can even see the odd panda), but the issues discussed apply to any team trying to adopt modern development practices, no matter what CI tool is used....
Just posted a new article about Continuous Integration and Build Automation on InfoQ, that I wrote in collaboration with my mates at Atlassian: An effective Continuous Integration environment can save your team time, money and even existential angst. It can enable bugs to be discovered earlier, their cause identified more easily, and ultimately get them resolved more efficiently. It can...
Sophie is a technical project manager in a large insurance firm. She manages the development of a web-based calculator for car insurance premiums. The calculations are done dynamically, using a sophisticated AJAX-based web interface. Car insurance premiums use complex algorithms, and it is vital that the web calculator results match those coming from the mainframe back-end to the cent. As a...