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Blog Archive for johnsmart during March 2008

The Java Power Tools Bootcamp training sessions are a great way to get a grip on some very cool open source technology. Maven 2, Continuous Integration with that very cool tool Hudson, the latest in TDD and BDD testing techniques with JUnit 4.4, Selenium, DBUnit, Cobertura, and more, not to mention Subversion, Checkstyle, PMD, FindBugs, Mylyn and lots of other goodies. And see how to use all of...
I will be giving a lunchtime talk in Wellington on the 8th of April on how Java development best practices can boost your productivity. In this talk, I will present some practical techniques for effective development of Java applications. The presentation will cover a number of key Java development practices and how these can improve productivity. For each...
People are saying lots of nice things about Java Power Tools already! "John’s upcoming book is a true masterpiece– I can’t recommend a better book for the Java community, baby!" - Andrew Glover, Stelligent "I can't wait to get my own copy!" - Alex Ruiz, FEST guru Andrew has reviewed the draft version of Java Power Tools and was kind enough to write the foreword, and Alex contributed...
The Java Power Tools book is coming out real soon. In conjunction with this event, I will be giving some special training sessions called the Java Power Tools Bootcamps from May 2008 onwards. The first courses will be in Wellington, San Francisco and London, with other cities in New Zealand, Australia, the USA and Europe planned for later on in the year. The Java Power Tools Bootcamp is an...
Paul Duvall, from Stelligent, has been experimenting with using voice commands to control a build server. A neat idea! The basic idea is to use Jott, which is a service that converts your voice messages into email messages. He is running fetchmail on Cygwin to download the mail messages, though, as he remarks, on a *nix build server, native mail tools would do the job with less mucking around....
So your CI server now automatically deploys your application to an integration server. You've even configured it so that you can manually deploy to the QA server using the same process. Great! But wouldn't it be nice to know exactly what build you are looking at at any point in time? Well, Hudson lets you do just that. When Hudson runs a build, it passes in a few useful environment variables,...
So you've got hundreds of tests, but they take ages to run. You have a Continuous Integration server, but it takes an hour to tell anyone when there's a failure. What can you do? This is where staged builds can come in handy. I basically distinguish fast unit tests from slower integration tests. TestNG test groups are very cool for this, but you can also use simple naming conventions. For example...