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Blog Archive for johnm during January 2004

Four security experts, including David Wagner and Avi Rubin, have published their critique of the so-called Secure Electronic Registration and Voting Experiment (SERVE) system. What their report boils down to is that SERVE is catastrophically flawed. Alas, since the inescapable conclusion doesn't fit with the desired outcome of people like the Pentagon, there's a lot of spin being spouted trying...
In Testing MVC actions, mock objects and code coverage, Simon Brown wonders aloud about how to think about the issue of code coverage via tests. It's quite simple really... The rationale for testing and high test-coverage rates is exactly the same as for brushing your teeth and flossing everyday.
"Mr. Ed" deconstructs the all too common tendency of developers to make horrendously vague propositions in his Basic Critical Thinking for Software Developers blog entry. His primary example is an assertion about pair programming so extreministas should definitely go wild. :-)
I recently wrote about Lego killing Mindstorms. It seems that Lego just put out a press release saying: Hearsay has it that a product range like LEGO MINDSTORMS is no longer in focus. This is not true. On the contrary, MINDSTORMS, CLIKITS and BIONICLE are all good examples of products the company wants to stake on. Well, there you go.
Yahoo news reports that Lego is going to kill off the geekily popular Lego Mindstorms. Basically, Lego, as an organization, just never learned to adapt to the high-paced world of high-tech toys. Heck, they didn't get the whole trend / tie-in toy market either. So, they lost a lot of money and now their going to try to deal with the consequences by retreating back into their old, core market....
Deepa Kandaswamy articulates his "seven reasons why women in technology remain invisible..." in Talibanism in Technology. What do you think? Aside from the sensationalistic title, is there really a problem? If so, what's the process by which to address it?
Luckily for us, Steve Jobs debuted the iPod mini in his MacWorld 2004 conference keynote. It's tiny and very slick. Even better, the control felt pretty nice. Alas, in all too typical Apple style, the $249 price tag is just plain silly -- they should have hit the $199 price point. Apple does get the Best Revisionist Video Award for reshowing their seminal 1984 TV commercial with an iPod...