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Blog Archive for joconner during June 2007

Instead of loading and working with ResourceBundle files directly, you will use the ResourceManager and ResourceMap framework classes to manage resources. A ResourceMap contains the resources defined in a specific ResourceBundle implementation. A map also contains links to its parent chain of ResoureMap objects. The parent chain for any class includes the ResourceMap for that specific class, the...
The Sun Developer Network has a few newsletters that you can subscribe to. One of the newsletters is Core Java Technologies Tech Tips. I still can't see that title without smiling. I'm always amused that Sun's proper use of the word "Java" must always have an approved noun after it: Java language, Java platform, Java technologies. It doesn't matter that Java Technologies Tech Tips sounds...
All applications have a lifecycle of events that are called in a specific order. Your primary Application or SingleFrameApplication subclass should start in its static main method and should launch the application from that point. The supported lifecycle includes the following methods, called in the same order: launch -- you must call this framework method initialize -- the framework will...
Two singleton classes help you manage your application: ApplicationContext and Application. The Application and ApplicationContext objects have a 1:1 relationship. The ApplicationContext provides services to the Application. Those services include the following: localizable resource management task services and monitoring event action management session state storage basic local data storage...
I mentioned in an earlier post that the Java Persistence API (JPA) could be used on the desktop. I'm still a database weakling, but learning about the JPA and how to use it from desktop applications wasn't nearly as difficult as I imagined. And what is it that I imagined? Well, I had heard a little, read a little, and observed a little bit of object-relational mapping technologies and had shyed...
The Swing Application Framework (JSR 296) is hardly a framework at all, not in the typical sense anyway. Frameworks are often big, heavy-structure libraries that force a specific application design. Although they may pay great dividends if you have the patience to master them, frameworks often require a huge commitment because of their complexity. Remember Microsoft's MFC framework or Borland's...