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Blog Archive for jhook during September 2005

At this point, I would like to show you some of the JSP pages we have in our application, but I'm sure there's a clause somewhere in my contract that says otherwise. Over the long term maintenance and feature-adds on large web applications, your JSP pages can start to look like variable soup. You have 10 to 15 variables being accessed that may have come from any scope, set by any action,...
There's been some chatter online about using JSF-specific annotations to drive application coordination. But, really it's your enterprise business model (EJB 3) that should be at the wheel. Within your business/domain objects, this is where all of your 'glue' coding happens, so lets extend EJB 3 a bit into a proper framework that starts to tie together the whole Java EE stack from the middle....
In my last blog entry, I 'kind of' complained about how JSF's component model was maintained and all the overhead involved. Really, I can't think of it as overhead, because it is tremendously richer in what it can do than other component frameworks. With JSF, each component has control over each step in the request cycle. But this is only half true. When I started to look at ways to...
I've been racking my brain lately, tossing around ideas. I've been working tons with Facelets technology with trying to push JSF into new directions, but it still sits on top of JSF. Not that there's anything wrong with what JSF does, it's really rich, almost too rich. JSF really 'gets' the concept of a component. It allows you to mingle components and accessory concerns such as listeners,...
Ruby on Rails: love it or hate it, but it does have a lot of fresh ideas. One of the really great things that RoR has done is presented AJAX functionality in an easy to use API. John Reynolds provided a nice list of AJAX/JavaScript sites in one of his last blog entries, one of which was script.aculo.us. The site includes RoR AJAX examples with source code. While light weight, I was suprised to...
Let me give you a hypothetical project that involves two groups. One group develops a thin client, that is delivered over the web. This thin client works in conjunction with a fat, installed client that the other group developed. The first beta hits, both groups have a couple kinks to work out. The thin client group makes their changes from their cubicle and tells the beta customer to refresh...