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Blog Archive for editor during June 2011

The results of the most recent java.net poll suggest that the JavaFX 2.0 Beta release is drawing mixed reviews from the developer community. A total of 58 votes were cast, and the voters posted seven comments. The exact poll question and results were: Do you intend to experiment with the JavaFX 2.0 Beta Release? 14% (8 votes) - I'm already working with it 17% (10 votes) - I've downloaded it...
The results of the last java.net poll indicate that the community in general considers the new java.net to be better than the previous edition of the site -- but further improvement in many areas is still needed. The poll was designed to be a forum through which the community could provide feedback on the changes to java.net that were implemented starting in late February. A total of 96 votes...
We've just published a new article on java.net: "A Method for Reducing Contention and Overhead in Worker Queues for Multithreaded Java Applications" by Sathiskumar Palaniappan, Kavitha Varadarajan, and Jayashree Viswanathan. The article addresses the problem of writing code that efficiently utilizes the resources of modern multicore processors and multiprocessor servers. The introduction sets...
One of the newest java.net projects is FasoJUG, the java.net home of Burkina Faso's new Java User Group. The JUG was founded by java.net member Constantin Drabo in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso. Constantin posted an entry at NetBeans Zone describing the launch of "the youngest African JUG" as follows: On the morning of 16 May 2011 some Java passionned guys assisted in the lauch of the latest JUG...
At the request of several members of the community, the current java.net poll will be staying open for some extra days, until Friday, June 10. If you haven't yet voted, please take the time to do so. Your vote and especially your comments will help us improve java.net going forward. The poll asks: Now that you're accustomed to it, what do you think of the new java.net? The results of the...
A few months ago, java.net underwent some pretty major changes: we migrated to a new project infrastructure (Kenai), and we switched to a modernized Web look and feel. The Kenai infrastructure brought many benefits to java.net projects, including the Subversion and Git version control systems, and JIRA issue and project tracking. And, as I wrote about in my last blog post, Sonatype's Nexus Maven...