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Blog Archive for editor during September 2010

Well, the first big JavaOne 2010 surprise for me has already happened. I'm following Oracle Technology Network leader Justin Kestelyn on Twitter tonight, as he reports on Larry Ellison's JavaOne opening keynote. Looks like Oracle is going to become a major player in Linux, on the enterprise side (who'd have guessed?). Justin says Oracle will offer two new Linux distributions: 1) a RedHat...
So you're going to JavaOne! What are you going to do there? Well, it all depends on what you're interested in, right? Lots of people have been posting their suggestions. Below, in no particular order, is a selection of recent suggestions on what to do at this year's JavaOne. Shai Almog: LWUIT At JavaOne 2010 - If you are going to JavaOne this year there are quite a few LWUIT related sessions/...
This past week's poll on whether this year's JavaOne will have an increased "corporate" feel didn't produce a clear result. A 37% plurality thought this year's JavaOne will indeed have a greater corporate feel, but 33% selected "I don't know." The exact question and results were: 37% (46 votes) - Greater - Oracle is a bigger corporation 6% (8 votes) - About the same 21% (26 votes) - Lesser -...
On August 28, I featured on the front page of java.net a forum post, asked by java.net user cowwoc and titled Is Java (on the desktop) dead? In this forum post, cowwoc noted: There was a time when java.net contained lots of exciting Desktop Java articles. Now all I ever see arOr is the desktop itself dying (except for programmers)?ound server-side enterprisy stuff. The same goes for javalobby....
This past week's java.net poll asked "What threat does further fragmentation of the Java language pose?" The results were somewhat surprising to me. A total of 182 votes were cast, with the following results: 19% (34 votes) - It will destroy Java 27% (49 votes) - It's not good, but Java will survive 12% (21 votes) - Java has so large an installed base that it doesn't matter 28% (51 votes) -...
If you'll be in the San Francisco area during JavaOne week, and you're interesting in attending some of JavaOne, but don't want to pay for the entire conference, consider purchasing a JavaOne / Oracle Develop Discover pass. The base Discover pass costs just $75 and provides you with entry into the keynote addresses, the exhibition halls, the Mason Street Tent (where I'll be spending quite a lot...