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Blog Archive for editor during March 2009

A very big round of thanks. Editing java.net for the last three years has been a process made infinitely more pleasant by the assistance and companionship of people from O'Reilly, Collabnet, and Sun that I've had the pleasure of working with. Indeed, those of us working on the site today are walking in the footsteps of those who originally created the site back in 2003. So, while all of...
Editorial changes this week So, a meta item to start the week: I'm stepping down as java.net editor, and my last day will be tomorrow, March 31. As of Wednesday, the front page will come to you courtesy of O'Reilly editor Kevin Farnham, who filled in for a few days last year while I was moving. He's also a veteran of several other O'Reilly community sites, and definitely knows what he's...
Just how open is Java? In a dispute that's likely to light up the Java blogosphere, Stephen Colebourne, co-creator of the First Class Methods closure proposal, is raising his concerns about the openness of the Java standard. In his blogNo more Java 7, he focuses on the history of the Java platform standard, from its aborted submission to ECMA in 1997, through the establishment of the JCP and...
How the OpenJDK team plans to get to JDK 7 OK, here we go. Here's the roadmap that gets us to JDK 7, and what we'll pick up along the way. Mark Reinhold's latest post, unassumingly titled JDK 7, lays out the path that OpenJDK will take over the next few months to get to a JDK 7 release in early 2010. At Devoxx back in December I presented a list of candidate features for JDK 7 (video...
GlassFish makes a splash at EclipseCon It's still a little weird seeing Sun as a top-tier EclipseCon sponsor, with the GlassFish community prominently present at the conference, considering the deep integration that's long been offered for GlassFish by the Sun-staffed java.net affiliate community NetBeans, a competitor to the Eclipse IDE. But maybe times have changed, and co-existence is more...
Getting your favorite dynamic language on the JVM In an interesting coincidence, two presentations hit the front page today, both on the topic of running dynamic languages on the JVM. Of course, that in itself is nothing new, as we've had JRuby, Jython, Groovy and the rest running on the JVM for a while. What is new is the extent of the effort to provide better support for running these...
Final week and a half for Project Coin submissions Perhaps your editor was unaware of the short running time of the Project Coin effort to collect a set of small language changes for inclusion in Java 7, but with Java 7 shooting for an early 2010 release, it makes sense: they need to pick the changes they're going to make, implement them, and give them a few months to get a full shake-out...
How are you spending the downturn? I've been talking with different people recently about the nature of the economic downturn. In my physical location, it's pretty bad: the state of Michigan has the highest unemployment in the U.S., thanks to its over-dependence on the collapsing auto industry. But as a work-from-home techie, that doesn't really affect me. And despite a lot of challenges...
Slick and special JavaFX apps contend for prizes As more and more developers dig into JavaFX, we don't lack for novel uses of the technology: the daily contributions to JFXStudio is testament to that. Now we're awaiting the next step: from "look mom!" demos and novelties to more complete, purposeful applications. To help encourage development of such apps, JavaFX.com is hosting a JavaFX...
And this is why you test and fix stuff There are a couple of interesting messages featured in the Forums section that speak to an experience surely all of us have had: people using our software in unexpected ways. It's so easy to develop your APIs or applications with certain use cases in mind that you don't anticipate and handle uses of your stuff that, while perhaps syntactically correct,...