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Blog Archive for editor during April 2008

Java 6 (finally) for Mac... now what? Long after its Sun-developed debut on Windows, Linux, and Solaris, Java SE 6 is finally available for the Mac. As I posted to the Mac Java Community's features feed: Available via to Software Update, Java for Mac OS X 10.5 Update 1 adds Java SE 6 version 1.6.0_05 to your Mac. This version of Java is only for Mac OS X v10.5.2 and later, and only runs...
Power up your robots for JavaOne One of the reasons we needed a bigger booth for JavaOne this year was so that the Trackbots would have room to roam. And they could be roaming with your code... The RoboHACC Programming Un-Contest is designed to challenge your coding skills in Java using the Greenfoot Framework/IDE to direct a Sun SPOT equipped TrackBot through an Arena with various...
NetBeans 6.1 makes an early debut Now this is a good idea. Rather than risk getting lost in all the news and hype of JavaOne week, when everyone and their brother seems to be making a major release announcement, the NetBeans team has surprised us by releasing NetBeans 6.1 final today, a week ahead of JavaOne. Go ahead and kick off the download, then keep reading. OK, so actually, it wasn...
Wave goodbye to languages without garbage collection It's not news to us -- we noted Java displacing C++ as the top language on Sourceforge a couple years ago, to say nothing of thousands of projects here on java.net. But Slashdot took the hint yesterday, asking Are C and C++ Losing Ground? They link to a Dr. Dobb's interview with TIOBE's Paul Jansen about the Programming Community Index,...
OpenJDK to add closures sub-project As I've noted in blogs over the last few months, all the major closure proposals are backed up with implementations, so it's possible for interested developers to take each out for a spin. In fact, to save you a few minutes of Googling, here are links to blog entries introducing each implementation: Neal Gafter (BGGA): Java Closures: first prototype...
Keeping up with the pre-JavaOne crunch Yesterday, Joshua Marinacci blogged that JavaOne's approach is like the preparation crunch that precedes a big holiday like Christmas. In the comments, I asked if he really meant by his metaphor that he'd literally been working on JavaOne stuff for weeks, or months. He writes, "by the time JavaOne gets here, I will have spent almost two full months...
The conferences and unconferences of JavaOne week There's the JavaOne conference, the topic-specific subconferences (NetBeans Day, etc.) that make up CommunityOne, and then there are the "unconferences" of J1 week. Chances are you've heard about unconferences, either in general or in the form of its best known examples: FOO Camp, the Java Posse Roundup, etc. The unconference format...