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Blog Archive for editor during June 2007

The debut of Java modules So, I go and complain about how slow things are, and what happens? One of the premiere features of JDK 7 drops its first snapshot. Which feature? Only the new module system for Java, addressing the complaints we've had about JARs for years. Obviously, I'll need to re-ping by featuring these on the front page again sometime next week. For now, the debut comes...
Finding and fixing bugs in heavily concurrent code A strong understanding of concurrency and threading is one of the traits that distinguishes the best Java developers, in every permutation of the platform. Servers by their very nature are heavily multi-threaded, good desktop developers know to thread off expensive work and unblock AWT-Event-Dispatch, and ME developers often have to...
Welcome back to the developer summer doldrums Every year, around July, it happens: things get sllllooooooowwwwwww. And it's happening already. JavaLobby posted no new stories yesterday. InfoQ only had one (at least with the Java-only filter on). Some of my other morning-check sites, including Artima, TheServerSide, and Café au Lait have been pretty slow too. Announcements from the...
Another strange trip with Flying Saucer Now here's an irony... despite the usual trend of media formats having being more readable than writable, PDF's may be easier to create than to view in Java SE. Adobe's own PDF component is long out of date, and many alternatives are commercial, although a list at schmidt.devlib.org does show some open-source readers. But for just writing PDF, the...
The concurrence of a web service stack's various pieces So why Metro? What's the deal big enough for several of our bloggers to be talking about it last week? I think Kohsuke does a great job explaining by example: I think this move is a bit like the one we did with JWSDP, for those of you who remember. Back then, we've been developing a bunch of composable but independent technologies (...
The movement to overthrow Java's checked exceptions So over the last few weeks, we've covered the debate in the community over the idea of ditching checked exceptions. Some developers have complained about checked exceptions over the years, but so far, it's mostly just been talk. Every now and then, you see frameworks where all the exceptions are RuntimeExceptions, and thus don't require...
Let your clients take some of the load off your webapp server In our second webapp feature article of the week, we take a look at the RAJAX project, which allows you to move more of your webapp out to the client side. As the project page says, "The main goal is to create a library that at runtime will generate a proxy JavaScript class to a server side Java class allowing the web programmer...
About halfway through the mini-talk podcasts As you'll recall, we've offered mini-talks from project owners and other community members in the java.net booth at JavaOne for the last three years, and for the last two, we've recorded them for podcasts. Last year, we tried to get them out quickly, in an attempt to capture the immediacy of the show, but a lot of them got lost in such a dramatic...
Swap your web MVC webapp pieces around A flexible and dynamic development environment is currently a great concern, and even though scripting languages have shown they can be of help, we still need to create applications that can be maintained easily while giving us what we need during development. Recognizing the usefulness of scripting languages, Java SE 6 introduced the new Java Scripting...
Has Matisse succeeded or failed? Not to beat a dead horse, but the discussion that has been moving around the Java community about using GUI-building tools versus writing your GUI's by hand continues to generate new opinions, anecdotal recommendations and warnings, and a fair amount of controversy. Over on JavaLobby, Michael Urban has touched off an intense debate by asking the open...