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Blog Archive for editor during September 2006

Wouldn't you like to build a "filthy rich" client? So where is everybody's favorite desktop Java rock star? For the purposes of this blog (because sometimes I mean Josh, or Rich, or Chet, or Kirill, or...), I'm talking about the deft and daft Romain Guy (say it together: Roh-MAHN GHEE), who came from Lyon with an inestimable grab-bag of JOGL tricks, Java2D blits, affine transforms and...
Maintaining identity and credentials A while back, Denis Pilupchuk wrote a definitive analysis of the relative strengths and weaknesses of Java and .NET security for ONJava. This exhaustive comparison nearly got me killed by my copy-editor (most feature articles run about 2,000 words; the final installment of the series was well over 7,000), and got into serious depth about not just the...
More on JRuby and Sun Last week, you'll recall the surprise announcement that the two primary JRuby developers are joining Sun. It's a particularly apt choice given the interest in Ruby from Java developers: it seems the one agile language with the greatest appeal to the Java mindset (I think Michael Ivey told me five years ago that I should give Ruby a try, that it was a natural fit for...
Taking a look at look-and-feel development I've only known a handful of people who've even attempted to develop a Swing look-and-feel, and those were all for internal corporate projects that were intended to only be used in one application, generally only on one operating system. The idea of creating a generally-useful L&F that could be widely distributed and used must be more of a...
Of polls and ballots I don't know if it's that the responses have been chosen with an eye to mixing up the results, or if the Java community is really this divided, but the last few polls on the site have been striking in their lack of consensus. Consider the recent poll asking Do You Use Groovy? With five responses, four of the five responses are clustered right around 25%, with a fifth...
Java? Ruby? Both? If you read Beyond Java, it was hard not to notice author Bruce Tate's clear affection for Ruby, which he clearly preferred not only to modern-day Java, but also to most of the dynamic languages out there. But it's easy to forget that he praised a lot of Java's accomplishments, such as how the JVM solves compatibility and security problems across operating systems. In...
Want a JVM with just the pieces you need? Stop me if you've heard this before: the JRE is too big to be a casual, on-demand download, so end users won't install it. If true, one solution is to download just enough of a JRE to bootstrap an application and then get just the pieces the user needs right then. If this is a familiar argument to you, then you're probably a long-time reader of Ethan...
Important facts you may have missed The forums were particularly interesting yesterday, and I ended up putting three forum items on the front page instead of the usual two. There were two others I thought about posting, but instead, I'd like to address their teachable moments in the daily blog. The first, by nishu_saini, is in the Java Advanced Imaging (JAI) forum, and asks Where are the...
Bringing substance to Swing's look-and-feels Desktop demands are weird. Give people an MP3 player, and the users will demand it be skinnable, so that one user can see his trackname and time like something from Star Trek, while someone else wants hers in script on mock papyrus. On the other hand, give people a wide-open look-and-feel engine that allows these and effectively any other...
Making conferences and unconferences more useful Do enough conferences and it's easy to get pretty jaded by the PowerPoint slides... oh, excuse me, StarOffice Impress slides... along with the hard sells, big promises, and presentations that are more valuable to the speaker than the audience. Do enough sessions and it's not hard to finally snap. For me, that would be at the JavaOne 2006 Blu-...