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Blog Archive for editor during January 2006

About those funny symbols... Now that Java is 10 years old, it should be obvious that it is now the first language for a lot of young programmers. Or at least their first serious one... lots of us went through a BASIC phase when we were 12. Still, the key point is that not everyone in the Java space will be a C/C++ convert who's done everything in the syntax of the classic "curly brace...
JRE code you shouldn't call It's tempting to call code that you know is in the JRE, and that you also know is off-limits. The fact that the class is packaged as com.sun and not java or javax is enough to tell you that it's an implementation detail, not a public API. Yet it's a hard-to-resist practice at times. Until J2SE 1.4 brought the Image I/O API's to the core, Java graphics books...
Rival posts, united by fate! Some days, the dots connect themselves. Earlier in the week, we had a day where a bunch of JNI related stuff popped up on different parts of the site, and we collected it on the front page in a fit of native code fury. This morning at 5 AM, as I'm loading up on Coke Zero and waiting for the CBC Radio 3 Podcast to download, I scroll through the RSS feeds from the...
eBay meets rich-client Java, by way of XML OK, GUI article for you today, one that doesn't involve AWT, SWT, or Swing. Instead, today's Feature Article introduces XUI, a rich-client framework that uses XML markup to declare and layout your widgets. Author Luan O'Carroll writes: As a rich-client framework, XUI takes care of some of the common tasks involved in constructing applications, and...
Dealing with native code Native code. Seriously. It's easy enough to say "why, after 10 years and with 3,500 classes just in core Java SE, do we even need native code? What could we possibly need that's not already available in Java or its standard libraries?" Good rhetorical question. And yet, when we asked in a poll How often do you write Java Native Interface (JNI) code?, only 60% of...
Web-crawling your own sites Seriously, in the age of Google, does your company or organization need its own search engine? Plenty of sites are happy to defer to Google by just putting a site:example.com in front of the search terms and throwing it over to the big search engine. Maybe going outside like this doesn't seem right to you, any more than using the yellow pages to find the phone...
The java.net Community Corner returns to JavaOne One of the best things about java.net's presence at last year's JavaOne was the Community Corner and the mini-talks. This gave project owners, community leaders, and others an opportunity to give 20-minute mini-talks in our booth space - complete with monitor, audio, and seating for an audience of a couple dozen. Some remarked that they liked...
Are CS students learning the right material? Continuing with the theme of whether computer science students are learning what they need to know in order to be quality software developers (or, if indeed that's the proper point of a computer science education), Fernando Lozano has checked in with an important viewpoint, someone who's actually taught computer science. In How Should You Teach...
Another fine day without pointers I'm going to try to get some coding done late today or early tomorrow. I won't have to worry about crashing because I typed too many (or too few) asterisks in defining a pointer or a pointer-pointer, or referring to freed memory, or running out of memory by forgetting to free something, or various other hazards. Entire classes of crash-worthy programming...
Following the OSWorkflow One of the most significant projects on java.net is OpenSymphony. It's a collection of enterprise frameworks that, inexplicably, isn't as well known as some other foundries, like Jakarta. One possible reason for this is that the pieces are very loosely coupled -- WebWork, Quartz, and TestNG are all popular of their own accord, but since none requires the others,...