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Blog Archive for editor during January 2006

Where did my System.out.println go? Double-clickable JARs are what we have as a base-line for reliably launching Java applications across platforms, including as double-clickable icons on the desktop. It's not a perfect solution -- robust and reliable cross-platform deployment is a big Java SE problem -- but it's pretty useful as far as it goes. Problem is, launching with a double-click...
Also in Projects and Communities, Amy Fowler's blog offers an Invitation to weigh in on the future of javadoc: "Javadoc's structure really hasn't changed at all in the last 10 years because it serves quite well as the Java platform's API reference. The questions we are trying to answer for JSR260 are should it evolve? and how?" She invites readers to answer these questions in a short (...
Applets: What Went Wrong? Throwing fuel on the fire, or dirt on the grave? Look at what the Wikipedia says in its article about AJAX: While the Ajax platform is more restricted than the Java platform, current Ajax applications effectively fill part of the one-time niche of Java applets: extending the browser with lightweight mini-applications. Ouch. Replaced by semi-standard JavaScript...
Mustang approaches Ray Gans' blog entry Where We Are With the JDK offers a major status update for the JDK projects -- Mustang (Java SE 6) and Dolphin (Java SE 7) -- and is effectively required reading, in order to set expectations of what's coming, when, and how: Sun began the Mustang project (Java SE 6) on java.net over a year ago when we started releasing weekly binary and source...
Of BlackBerries, patents, and extortion Timing is a curious thing. About the time our producer was looking at today's feature article on developing J2ME applications for the BlackBerry handheld, the U.S. Supreme Court was issuing a ruling refusing to get involved in a BlackBerry patent case. The patent-infringement case has consistently gone against BlackBerry maker Research In Motion (RIM...
Will your app take home a Dukie? The JavaOne keynotes have a section that can be an inspiring affirmation of the power of Java... and it's not whiz-bang neato-keen demos that will never be real applications that anyone uses. I think it's far more impressive to see recognition of real applications. In particular, it's nice to innovation recognized and rewarded in the Java realm. For example...
Hey, what'cha downloading? One of the discussions we had in this week's infrastructure meeting was prompted by one of our old polls, How active are you in java.net projects? One of the slight controversies, as you'll see in the comments to that poll, is that in a descending level of commitment and activity, we went from "Have discussed projects in lists/forums" to "Not active in projects"....
Catching bogus input with WebWork OpenSymphony's WebWork is a web application framework designed to keep productivity high and the code simple. It has gained popularity for several reasons, including its integration with Spring, a powerful tag library, and OGNL support. Its powerful validation framework is borrowed from another OpenSymphony project, XWork. WebWork doesn't get as much...
The underappreciated hazards of blogging Over at JavaLobby, Rick Ross is kicking off a very interesting program to spur interest and attention in overlooked blogs. In this week's newsletter, he announces a program to reward good blogs with a small cash bounty: $50, $30, and $20 to the top three blogs each day. Here's his rationale: Having managed the 10,000-blog JRoller.com service for...