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Blog Archive for editor during November 2005

Making your web app manageable Surely, you've had a "what the heck is my code doing and why" moment. What makes it worse is when your code is in production on a remote server. So now what do you do? One option is remote debugging, but that may be lower level than what you need. Sometimes what you need is the ability to arbitrarily call methods of your own to get reports on the web app's...
Is "Beyond Java" wrong about productivity and tools? Now that more people are kicking around the ideas of Beyond Java -- not just its back-cover blurbs, but the text of the book itself -- we're starting to see some more in-depth, carefully reasoned discussion and criticism of the book and its ideas. Navaneeth Krishnan digs into two of the books central tenets in his Weblogs entry, Beyond...
Startling speed in the latest Mustang build? OK, I don't have an Intel box in the house, meaning I can't run the Mustang weekly builds as they drop each week, but the flow of developments has me wondering if I should get some appropriate hardware to join in the fun. Two weeks ago, we saw a fast new bytecode validator rolled out, with a challenge to Crack The Verifier and ensure that this...
Try our challenging generics quiz Java Tech columnist Jeff Friesen wanted to write something on the topic of generics in J2SE 5.0, but the basic generics intro had been done a lot of times already. Indeed, the Java community seems to have already moved from trying to understand generics to debating their value, as you may have seen on some of the forums over the last few months. So Jeff came...
The Book Club discussion reaches "Beyond Java"s turning point A new chapter is open for discussion in the Book Club forum's discussion of Beyond Java. The thread Chapter 3: Crown Jewels kicks off: Chapter 3 looks at Java's innate strengths, though it concludes those strengths may not be today what they once were. Bruce Tate writes "I get enormous productivity jolts out of Java's incredible...
JavaOne Tokyo 2005 begins When my alarm -- and I'm talking about a child, not a clock -- went off at 4 AM this morning, it was already Tuesday afternoon in Tokyo and the end of the first day of JavaOne Tokyo (日本語). Several java.net bloggers are at the conference -- including John O'Conner, Gregg Sporar, and Joshua Marinacci -- and they're providing coverage, opinion, and...
What the java.net community is thinking Truth be told, there's usually some sort of motivation behind the java.net Poll that's launched every Friday. Nothing nefarious, I think, and we try not to be biased, but usually there's an idea that we have that leads to our asking a poll question, sometimes as a way of confirming or debunking commonly-held beliefs. Or, preferably, to kick off...
Beefing up your Trails app A while back, Chris Nelson introduced the Trails web application framework, an admittedly Rails-inspired system for pulling together the basics of a web application -- putting a web interface atop CRUD database manipulation -- with a minimum of fuss, hassle, or heavy lifting. The trick with some simple frameworks is that they end up being too limiting. Fortunately...
Mustang progress front and center I've pointed this out a few times, but the openness of the Mustang project is really a remarkable thing. Remember, this is the version of Java that we're all going to be downloading and running next year, and its development is in full view of the coding public. Earlier in the week, we saw the unveiling of the Crack The Verifier initiative, which challenges...