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Blog Archive for editor during October 2005

Announcing your project I'll assume for the purposes of this blog that project owners actually want to get the word out about their projects: that they want their stuff to be used, they want feedback (bug reports or encouraging forum posts), that they want other programmers to commit code. Maybe there's a case where this isn't true, but if so, why host on an open source site like java.net?...
Discovering the Next Big Thing Where did the AJAX wave come from? Or, last year, Hibernate? I'm not asking about how these are coded -- after all, one is an informal collection of practices, the other an open-source project -- I'm asking how is it that so many people came to be so aware of and enthusiastic about these two. After all, they are two of the biggest developments in the Java...
Is it still OO if we don't get to subclass? Our "(Not So) Stupid Questions" series returns today with the Feature Article, Inheritance vs. Interfaces, which asks the question "When should I implement an interface, over inheriting from a parent class?" Seems simple enough, right? But there's a story here about how much times have changed. Take a look through your favorite object heirarchy...
Join the Mustang bug (fix) parade! If you've been following along with John O'Conner's Blog, you'll recall that he's currently relating, in a series of dispatches, his effort to become a Mustang contribor and to start with some simple fixes. The obvious message: if he can do it, you and I can do it too. In his most recent entry, he reports that he has been granted contributor access, and now...
Looking for bugs in new places Do you give much thought to configuration files? Do you think of them as part of your application, on par with the Java code itself? On the one hand, this is pretty much obvious: take away the config files and your program may not work at all, so of course they're "part" of your app. On the other hand, they're obviously relegated to second-class status in...
Debunking Java performance myths OK, just skip straight to it: Java theory and practice: Urban performance legends, revisited by Brian Goetz, featured in the Also in Java Today section. This puts to rest a lot of widely-believed bad information about object allocation performance, and retires once-good advice that is no longer recommended. While you're at it, enjoy the Slashdot discussion...
Blame the "Bean" Sometimes I wonder if it's just too easy to heap scorn on EJB 2.1. Maybe it was bold to do so when Spring and Hibernate went their "better, faster, lighter" way, and maybe it was made acceptable by the EJB 3.0 spec smoothing over more baroque aspects of EJB to make it less of a hassle to work with. Setting aside the fact that lots of people have gotten EJB 2.1 to deliver for...
Re-discovering RMI Back in Java 1.1, RMI was great. Even when it wasn't. And what wasn't great was something you figured out when you'd already committed and it was way too late to turn back. For me, it was the choice to use two-way RMI, allowing a server to call back to clients on a LAN with an event-like scheme. Really pretty code. It's just that it had a tendency to not work across...
Asserting Java's place in Web 2.0 The Web 2.0 Conference kicks off in San Francisco today -- check out the Conference Coverage page for updates and developments -- and it provides a moment to think about what Java's role in this evolving online experience will be. Seriously, think about it for a minute. Java is well-equipped to deliver on a lot of the Web 2.0 ideals, if only the tech elite...
The continuing consideration of our intellectual successors. "There seems to be an increasing level of this thing we cannot adequately define but are very capable of testing for various purposes: intelligence. Whether silicon based or human, the general level of intelligence is rising. The difference between our digital offspring and ourselves is one of degree, not direction." In today's...